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Sci Transl Med. 2017 Oct 11;9(411). pii: eaah6756. doi: 10.1126/scitranslmed.aah6756.

Functional ultrasound imaging of brain activity in human newborns.

Author information

1
Institut Langevin, CNRS UMR 7587, INSERM U979, École Supérieure de Physique et de Chimie Industrielles (ESPCI) Paris, Paris Sciences et Lettres Research University, 75005 Paris, France.
2
Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Neurophysiology Unit, Robert Debré University Hospital, 75019 Paris, France.
3
Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Pediatric Neurology Department, Robert Debré University Hospital, 75019 Paris, France.
4
Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Robert Debré University Hospital, 75019 Paris, France.
5
Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Pediatric Radiology Department, Robert Debré University Hospital, 75019 Paris, France.
6
Promoting Research Oriented Towards Early Central Nervous System Therapies (PROTECT), INSERM U1141, Université Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France.
7
Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Robert Debré University Hospital, 75019 Paris, France. olivier.baud@aphp.fr.
8
Division of Neonatology and Pediatric Intensive Care, Children's University Hospital of Geneva and University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland.
9
Fondation PremUp, 75014 Paris, France.

Abstract

Functional neuroimaging modalities are crucial for understanding brain function, but their clinical use is challenging. Recently, the use of ultrasonic plane waves transmitted at ultrafast frame rates was shown to allow for the spatiotemporal identification of brain activation through neurovascular coupling in rodents. Using a customized flexible and noninvasive headmount, we demonstrate in human neonates that real-time functional ultrasound imaging (fUSI) is feasible by combining simultaneous continuous video-electroencephalography (EEG) recording and ultrafast Doppler (UfD) imaging of the brain microvasculature. fUSI detected very small cerebral blood volume variations in the brains of neonates that closely correlated with two different sleep states defined by EEG recordings. fUSI was also used to assess brain activity in two neonates with congenital abnormal cortical development enabling elucidation of the dynamics of neonatal seizures with high spatiotemporal resolution (200 μm for UfD and 1 ms for EEG). fUSI was then applied to track how waves of vascular changes were propagated during interictal periods and to determine the ictal foci of the seizures. Imaging the human brain with fUSI enables high-resolution identification of brain activation through neurovascular coupling and may provide new insights into seizure analysis and the monitoring of brain function.

PMID:
29021168
DOI:
10.1126/scitranslmed.aah6756
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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