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Nature. 2017 Oct 19;550(7676):345-353. doi: 10.1038/nature24286. Epub 2017 Oct 11.

DNA sequencing at 40: past, present and future.

Author information

1
Department of Genome Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.
2
Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Seattle, Washington, USA.
3
Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK.
4
Cancer Research UK Cambridge Institute, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK.
5
The Wyss Institute & Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
6
Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge Massachusetts, USA.
7
International Wheat Genome Sequencing Consortium, Little Eversden, Cambridge, UK.
8
National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA.

Abstract

This review commemorates the 40th anniversary of DNA sequencing, a period in which we have already witnessed multiple technological revolutions and a growth in scale from a few kilobases to the first human genome, and now to millions of human and a myriad of other genomes. DNA sequencing has been extensively and creatively repurposed, including as a 'counter' for a vast range of molecular phenomena. We predict that in the long view of history, the impact of DNA sequencing will be on a par with that of the microscope.

PMID:
29019985
DOI:
10.1038/nature24286
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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