Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Cancer Prev. 2017 Sep;22(3):159-165. doi: 10.15430/JCP.2017.22.3.159. Epub 2017 Sep 30.

Comparison of Colonoscopy Surveillance Outcomes Between Young and Older Colorectal Cancer Patients.

Kim SB1,2, Lee HJ1,2, Park SJ1,2, Hong SP1,2, Cheon JH1,2, Kim WH1,2, Kim TI1,2,3.

Author information

1
Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
2
Institute of Gastroenterology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
3
Cancer Prevention Center, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Young-onset colorectal cancer is uncommon, but the incidence is increasing. Despite several guidelines for colonoscopic surveillance following colorectal cancer resection, there is little consistency regarding the timing and age-adjusted strategies of surveillance colonoscopy after surgery of young-onset colorectal cancer. The aim of this study was to compare the outcomes of surveillance colonoscopy between sporadic colorectal cancer patients with young and older age after curative resection.

METHODS:

We retrospectively reviewed 569 colorectal cancer patients who underwent curative resection between January 2006 and December 2010. The primary outcome was comparison of the development of metachronous advanced neoplasia during surveillance colonoscopy between young and older colorectal cancer patients.

RESULTS:

There were 95 patients in the young age group and 474 patients in the older age group. The mean time interval from surgery to the development of metachronous advanced neoplasia was 99.2 ± 3.7 months in the young age group and 84.4 ± 2.5 months in the old age group (P = 0.03). In the multivariate analysis, age (OR, 3.56; P = 0.04) and family history of colorectal cancer (OR, 2.66; P = 0.008) were associated with the development of metachronous advanced neoplasia. None of the young patients without both family history of colorectal cancer and high-risk findings at index colonoscopy showed advanced neoplasia during the follow-up period.

CONCLUSIONS:

Age and family history of colorectal cancer are independent risk factors for the occurrence of advanced neoplasia after curative colorectal cancer resection, suggesting age-adjusted strategies of surveillance colonoscopy.

KEYWORDS:

Age of onset; Colonoscopy; Colorectal neoplasms; Surveillance

Conflict of interest statement

CONFLICTS OF INTEREST No potential conflicts of interest were disclosed.

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center