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Environ Health Perspect. 2017 Oct 10;125(10):106002. doi: 10.1289/EHP424.

Nanomaterials Versus Ambient Ultrafine Particles: An Opportunity to Exchange Toxicology Knowledge.

Author information

1
Institute of Biological Chemistry, Biophysics and Bioengineering, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh, Scotland, UK
2
Centre for Cardiovascular Science, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Scotland, UK
3
Adolphe Merkle Institute, University of Fribourg, Fribourg, Switzerland
4
Swansea University Medical School, Swansea, Wales, UK
5
University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York
6
Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark
7
IUF Leibniz-Institut für Umweltmedizinische Forschung, Düsseldorf, Germany
8
National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark
9
Department of Micro- and Nanotechnology, Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby, Denmark
10
Helmholtz Zentrum München, German Research Center for Environmental Health (GmbH), Institute of Epidemiology, Munich, Germany
11
Air Quality & Sustainable Nanotechnology Unit, Institut für Energie- und Umwelttechnik e. V. (IUTA), Duisburg, Germany
12
Federal Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, Duisburg, Germany
13
Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway
14
Center for Environment and Health, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Leuven, Belgium
15
Department of Biomedicine and Prevention, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy
16
Departmento de Toxicología, Center for Research and Advanced Studies of the National Polytechnic Institute (CINVESTAV-IPN), México City, México
17
Paris Diderot University, Paris, France
18
National Institute of Health, Porto, Portugal
19
Instituto de Saúde Pública da Universidade do Porto–Epidemiology (ISPUP-EPI) Unit, Porto, Portugal
20
Institute of Occupational Medicine, Edinburgh, Scotland, UK
21
National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, Netherlands
22
Institute of Risk Assessment Sciences, Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

A rich body of literature exists that has demonstrated adverse human health effects following exposure to ambient air particulate matter (PM), and there is strong support for an important role of ultrafine (nanosized) particles. At present, relatively few human health or epidemiology data exist for engineered nanomaterials (NMs) despite clear parallels in their physicochemical properties and biological actions in in vitro models.

OBJECTIVES:

NMs are available with a range of physicochemical characteristics, which allows a more systematic toxicological analysis. Therefore, the study of ultrafine particles (UFP, <100 nm in diameter) provides an opportunity to identify plausible health effects for NMs, and the study of NMs provides an opportunity to facilitate the understanding of the mechanism of toxicity of UFP.

METHODS:

A workshop of experts systematically analyzed the available information and identified 19 key lessons that can facilitate knowledge exchange between these discipline areas.

DISCUSSION:

Key lessons range from the availability of specific techniques and standard protocols for physicochemical characterization and toxicology assessment to understanding and defining dose and the molecular mechanisms of toxicity. This review identifies a number of key areas in which additional research prioritization would facilitate both research fields simultaneously.

CONCLUSION:

There is now an opportunity to apply knowledge from NM toxicology and use it to better inform PM health risk research and vice versa. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP424.

PMID:
29017987
PMCID:
PMC5933410
DOI:
10.1289/EHP424
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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