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World Neurosurg. 2018 Feb;110:e53-e59. doi: 10.1016/j.wneu.2017.09.205. Epub 2017 Oct 7.

Syrinx to Subarachnoid Shunting for Syringomyelia.

Author information

1
Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Macquarie University, New South Wales, Sydney, Australia.
2
Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Macquarie University, New South Wales, Sydney, Australia. Electronic address: marcus.stoodley@mq.edu.au.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Surgery for syringomyelia generally aims to treat the underlying cause, if it is known. Optimal management is unclear for idiopathic syringomyelia, or when treatment of the putative cause has failed or is high risk. Syrinx to subarachnoid shunting is an option for these cases; a series is reported to assess the outcomes of this approach.

METHODS:

We retrospectively analyzed the clinical and radiologic features of a consecutive series of patients with syringomyelia treated with syrinx to subarachnoid shunting.

RESULTS:

Forty-one patients (19 male, 4-79 years old) were treated from 2000 to 2016, including 15 patients with idiopathic syringomyelia, 13 with spinal trauma, 5 with Chiari malformation, 4 with arachnoiditis, 3 with tethered cord, and 1 with arachnoid bands. The patients were treated with a syrinx to subarachnoid shunt, and a subset also underwent expansile duraplasty. At follow-up (3-108 months, mean 36 months) syrinx size was reduced in 37 patients, and there was improvement or stabilization of symptoms in all but 1 patient. Three patients had temporary lower limb sensory symptoms after surgery. Other complications were 2 transient cerebrospinal fluid leaks, a pseudomeningocoele, and 1 postoperative myocardial infarction. Two cases of shunt dislodgement required reoperation, and a third case required early reoperation for an enlarging syrinx. There were no cases of shunt blockage or infection.

CONCLUSIONS:

Syrinx to subarachnoid shunting is a safe and effective treatment for idiopathic syringomyelia and for patients who are not suitable for, or have not responded to, other treatment.

KEYWORDS:

Shunt; Spinal cord; Subarachnoid Space; Syringomyelia; Syrinx

PMID:
29017977
DOI:
10.1016/j.wneu.2017.09.205
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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