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J Am Acad Dermatol. 2018 Jan;78(1):54-61.e1. doi: 10.1016/j.jaad.2017.08.002. Epub 2017 Oct 7.

The burden of atopic dermatitis in US adults: Health care resource utilization data from the 2013 National Health and Wellness Survey.

Author information

1
Sanofi, Chilly-Mazarin, France. Electronic address: Laurent.Eckert@sanofi.com.
2
Kantar Health, Princeton, New Jersey.
3
Sanofi, Chilly-Mazarin, France.
4
Regeneron, Tarrytown, New York.
5
Sanofi, Bridgewater, New Jersey.
6
Department of Dermatology and Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

There is a lack of data on the burden of atopic dermatitis (AD) in adults relative to the general population.

OBJECTIVE:

To characterize the AD burden in adult patients relative to both matched non-AD controls and matched patients with psoriasis in terms of comorbidities, health care resource utilization (HCRU), and costs.

METHODS:

Adults (≥18 years) who self-reported a diagnosis of AD or psoriasis and adult non-AD controls were identified from the 2013 US National Health and Wellness Survey. Patients with AD were propensity score-matched with non-AD controls and patients with psoriasis on demographic variables. Patient-reported outcomes were analyzed between matched cohorts.

RESULTS:

Patients with AD had a significantly greater risk for atopic comorbidities, as well as significantly greater HCRU and total cost compared with non-AD controls. The burden of AD was generally comparable to that of psoriasis, although patients with AD reported increased use of emergency room visits compared with patients with psoriasis.

LIMITATIONS:

Patient-reported data are susceptible to recall bias and erroneous classification.

CONCLUSIONS:

Adult patients with AD reported a substantial disease burden, suggesting an unmet need for more effective AD treatment options.

KEYWORDS:

Atopic dermatitis; burden of disease; comorbidities; disease severity; health care resource utilization; patient-reported outcomes

PMID:
29017738
DOI:
10.1016/j.jaad.2017.08.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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