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Am J Clin Dermatol. 2018 Apr;19(2):223-235. doi: 10.1007/s40257-017-0323-8.

Vitamin D and the Skin: An Update for Dermatologists.

Author information

1
Department of Dermatology, Hôpital Henri Mondor, 51 Avenue du Maréchal de Lattre de Tassigny, 94010, Créteil, France.
2
Faculty of Medicine, Saint Joseph University, Beirut, Lebanon.
3
Department of Dermatology, Hôpital Henri Mondor, 51 Avenue du Maréchal de Lattre de Tassigny, 94010, Créteil, France. Khaled.ezzedine@aphp.fr.
4
EA EpiDermE (Epidémiologie en Dermatologie et Evaluation des Thérapeutiques), UPEC-Université Paris-Est Créteil, 94010, Créteil, France. Khaled.ezzedine@aphp.fr.

Abstract

Vitamin D plays a key role in skeletal and cardiovascular disorders, cancers, central nervous system diseases, reproductive diseases, infections, and autoimmune and dermatological disorders. The two main sources of vitamin D are sun exposure and oral intake, including vitamin D supplementation and dietary intake. Multiple factors are linked to vitamin D status, such as Fitzpatrick skin type, sex, body mass index, physical activity, alcohol intake, and vitamin D receptor polymorphisms. Patients with photosensitive disorders tend to avoid sun exposure, and this practice, along with photoprotection, can put this category of patients at risk for vitamin D deficiency. Maintaining a vitamin D serum concentration within normal levels is warranted in atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, vitiligo, polymorphous light eruption, mycosis fungoides, alopecia areata, systemic lupus erythematosus, and melanoma patients. The potential determinants of vitamin D status, as well as the benefits and risks of vitamin D (with a special focus on the skin), will be discussed in this article.

PMID:
28994020
DOI:
10.1007/s40257-017-0323-8
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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