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Rheumatol Int. 2017 Nov;37(11):1891-1898. doi: 10.1007/s00296-017-3836-9. Epub 2017 Oct 9.

Serum serotonin levels and bone in rheumatoid arthritis patients.

Author information

1
Department of Rheumatology, São João Hospital Center, Alameda Prof. Hernâni Monteiro, 4200-319, Porto, Portugal. mbernardes09@gmail.com.
2
Medicine Department, Faculty of Medicine, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal. mbernardes09@gmail.com.
3
Department of Nuclear Medicine, São João Hospital Center, Porto, Portugal.
4
EPIUnit-Institute of Public Health, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal.
5
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Predictive Medicine and Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal.
6
Department of Rheumatology, São João Hospital Center, Alameda Prof. Hernâni Monteiro, 4200-319, Porto, Portugal.
7
Faculty of Medicine, University of Porto (FMUP), Porto, Portugal.
8
Unit of Biochemistry, Department of Biomedicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal.
9
Instituto de Investigação e Inovação em Saúde (i3s), University of Porto, Porto, Portugal.

Abstract

In rheumatoid arthritis (RA), a disease characterized by bone loss, increased levels of serotonin have been reported. Recent studies have demonstrated a role for circulating serotonin as a regulator of osteoblastogenesis, inhibiting bone formation. Thus, we measured serum serotonin levels (SSL) in a Portuguese sample of 205 RA patients and related these to anthropometric variables, disease parameters, serum bone biomarkers, and bone mineral density (BMD) assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry at several sites (total proximal femur, lumbar spine, left hand, and left second proximal phalange). SSL were inversely associated with body mass index (BMI) in RA women (r = - 0.218; p = 0.005), independent of exposure to biologics and/or bisphosphonates. Among biologic naïves, there was an inverse association between SSL and osteoprotegerin in RA women (r = - 0.260; p = 0.022). Serum β-CTX and dickkopf-1 were strongly associated with SSL in RA men not treated with bisphosphonates (r = 0.590; p < 0.001/r = 0.387; p = 0.031, respectively). There was also an inverse association between SSL and sclerostin in RA men (r = - 0.374; p < 0.05), stronger among biologic naïve or bisphosphonates-unexposed RA men. In crude models, SSL presented as a significant negative predictor of total proximal femur BMD in RA women as well as in postmenopausal RA women. After adjustment for BMI, disease duration, and years of menopause, SSL remained a significant negative predictor of total proximal femur BMD only in postmenopausal RA women. Our data reinforce a role, despite weak, for circulating serotonin in regulating bone mass in RA patients, with some differences in terms of gender and anatomical sites.

KEYWORDS:

Biochemical markers of bone turnover; DXA; Osteoimmunology; Other diseases and disorders of/related to bone; Wnt/β-catenin/LRPs

PMID:
28993870
DOI:
10.1007/s00296-017-3836-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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