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Sci Rep. 2017 Oct 9;7(1):12863. doi: 10.1038/s41598-017-12779-5.

Short term changes in the proteome of human cerebral organoids induced by 5-MeO-DMT.

Author information

1
D'Or Institute for Research and Education (IDOR), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
2
Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
3
Laboratory of Neuroproteomics, Institute of Biology, Department of Biochemistry and Tissue Biology, University of Campinas (UNICAMP), Campinas, Brazil.
4
Brain Institute, Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, Brazil.
5
Instituto Nacional de Biomarcadores em Neuropsiquiatria (INBION), Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Cientifico e Tecnologico, Sao Paulo, Brazil.
6
D'Or Institute for Research and Education (IDOR), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. srehen@lance-ufrj.org.
7
Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. srehen@lance-ufrj.org.

Abstract

Dimethyltryptamines are entheogenic serotonin-like molecules present in traditional Amerindian medicine recently associated with cognitive gains, antidepressant effects, and changes in brain areas related to attention. Legal restrictions and the lack of adequate experimental models have limited the understanding of how such substances impact human brain metabolism. Here we used shotgun mass spectrometry to explore proteomic differences induced by 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (5-MeO-DMT) on human cerebral organoids. Out of the 6,728 identified proteins, 934 were found differentially expressed in 5-MeO-DMT-treated cerebral organoids. In silico analysis reinforced previously reported anti-inflammatory actions of 5-MeO-DMT and revealed modulatory effects on proteins associated with long-term potentiation, the formation of dendritic spines, including those involved in cellular protrusion formation, microtubule dynamics, and cytoskeletal reorganization. Our data offer the first insight about molecular alterations caused by 5-MeO-DMT in human cerebral organoids.

PMID:
28993683
PMCID:
PMC5634411
DOI:
10.1038/s41598-017-12779-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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