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Am J Epidemiol. 2018 Mar 1;187(3):441-454. doi: 10.1093/aje/kwx273.

Associations Between Sedentary Behaviors and Cognitive Function: Cross-Sectional and Prospective Findings From the UK Biobank.

Bakrania K1,2,3,4,5, Edwardson CL2,3,4, Khunti K2,3,5, Bandelow S6, Davies MJ2,3,4, Yates T2,3,4.

Author information

1
Department of Health Sciences, University of Leicester, Leicester General Hospital, Leicester, United Kingdom.
2
Diabetes Research Centre, University of Leicester, Leicester General Hospital, Leicester, United Kingdom.
3
Leicester Diabetes Centre, University Hospitals of Leicester, Leicester General Hospital, Leicester, United Kingdom.
4
National Institute for Health Research Leicester Biomedical Research Centre, Leicester General Hospital, Leicester, United Kingdom.
5
National Institute for Health Research Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care-East Midlands, Diabetes Research Centre, Leicester General Hospital, Leicester, United Kingdom.
6
School of Sport, Exercise, and Health Sciences, Loughborough University, Loughborough, United Kingdom.

Abstract

We investigated the cross-sectional and prospective associations between different sedentary behaviors and cognitive function in a large sample of adults with data stored in the UK Biobank. Baseline data were available for 502,643 participants (2006-2010, United Kingdom). Cognitive tests included prospective memory (baseline only: n = 171,585), visual-spatial memory (round 1: n = 483,832; round 2: n = 482,762), fluid intelligence (n = 165,492), and short-term numeric memory (n = 50,370). After a mean period of 5.3 years, participants (numbering from 12,091 to 114,373, depending on the test) also provided follow-up cognitive data. Sedentary behaviors (television viewing, driving, and nonoccupational computer-use time) were measured at baseline. At baseline, both television viewing and driving time were inversely associated with cognitive function across all outcomes (e.g., for each additional hour spent watching television, the total number of correct answers in the fluid intelligence test was 0.15 (99% confidence interval: 0.14, 0.16) lower. Computer-use time was positively associated with cognitive function across all outcomes. Both television viewing and driving time at baseline were positively associated with the odds of having cognitive decline at follow-up across most outcomes. Conversely, computer-use time at baseline was inversely associated with the odds of having cognitive decline at follow-up across most outcomes. This study supports health policies designed to reduce television viewing and driving in adults.

PMID:
28992036
DOI:
10.1093/aje/kwx273

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