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World J Hepatol. 2017 Sep 18;9(26):1108-1114. doi: 10.4254/wjh.v9.i26.1108.

Conjugated hyperbilirubinemia presenting in first fourteen days in term neonates.

Author information

1
Gastroenterology Service, Paediatric Medicine, KK Women's and Children's Hospital, Singapore 229899, Singapore.
2
Neonatal Medicine, Al Jalila Children's Specialty Hospital, Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
3
Pediatric Gastroenterology, Dubai Hospital, Dubai, United Arab Emirates. ajmalkader@dha.gov.ae.

Abstract

AIM:

To describe the etiology and characteristics of early-onset conjugated hyperbilirubinemia (ECHB) presenting within 14 d of life in term neonates.

METHODS:

Retrospective review was performed of term infants up to 28-d-old who presented with conjugated hyperbilirubinemia (CHB) at a tertiary center over a 5-year period from January 2010 to December 2014. CHB is defined as conjugated bilirubin (CB) fraction greater than 15% of total bilirubin and CB greater or equal to 25 ╬╝mol/L. ECHB is defined as CHB detected within 14 d of life. "Late-onset" CHB (LCHB) is detected at 15-28 d of life and served as the comparison group.

RESULTS:

Total of 117 patients were recruited: 65 had ECHB, 52 had LCHB. Neonates with ECHB were more likely to be clinically unwell (80.0% vs 42.3%, P < 0.001) and associated with non-hepatic causes (73.8% vs 44.2%, P = 0.001) compared to LCHB. Multifactorial liver injury (75.0%) and sepsis (17.3%) were the most common causes of ECHB in clinically unwell infants, majority (87.5%) had resolution of CHB with no progression to chronic liver disease. Inborn errors of metabolism were rare (5.8%) but associated with high mortality (100%) in our series. In the subgroup of clinically well infants (n = 13) with ECHB, biliary atresia (BA) was the most common diagnosis (61.5%), all presented initially with normal stools and decline in total bilirubin but with persistent CHB.

CONCLUSION:

Secondary hepatic injury is the most common reason for ECHB. BA presents with ECHB in well infants without classical symptoms of pale stools and deep jaundice.

KEYWORDS:

Biliary atresia; Cholestasis; Conjugated hyperbilirubinemia; Direct hyperbilirubinemia; Neonatal jaundice

Conflict of interest statement

Conflict-of-interest statement: The authors have no conflict of interest to declare.

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