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Int Orthop. 2018 Mar;42(3):595-600. doi: 10.1007/s00264-017-3657-1. Epub 2017 Oct 7.

Risk factors for development of severe post-traumatic elbow stiffness.

Author information

1
Department of Orthopaedics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People's Hospital, 600 Yishan Road, Shanghai, 200233, People's Republic of China.
2
Department of Orthopaedics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People's Hospital, 600 Yishan Road, Shanghai, 200233, People's Republic of China. cyfan@sjtu.edu.cn.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The purpose of this study was to compare different grades of elbow stiffness and investigate demographic, injury, and treatment factors potentially associated with the development of severe elbow stiffness.

METHODS:

We performed a retrospective study involving 169 patients with post-traumatic elbow stiffness between June 2014 and June 2016. Patient demographics, injury, and treatment details were reviewed. Patients were classified into three groups according to the elbow motion. Ordinal regression analyses were performed to examine the independent factors.

RESULTS:

Patients were classified into: mild (49 patients), moderate (59 patients), and severe (61 patients) groups. Patients with severe stiffness had a significantly worse elbow functional performance. Univariate ordinal regression revealed that severe elbow stiffness was associated with high-energy injury (odds ratio [OR] 4.73), olecranon fracture (OR 1.92), fracture-dislocation (OR 2.28), and open fracture (OR 3.24). Multivariate regression showed that higher-energy injuries were associated with severe stiffness (OR 4.45, p = 0.003).

CONCLUSIONS:

Elbow stiffness after fracture surgery often results in joint stiffness. Severe stiffness often resulted in more significant functional impairment. Our study suggested that high-energy injuries were associated with the development of severe elbow stiffness.

KEYWORDS:

Complication; Elbow fracture; Functional performance; Post-traumatic elbow stiffness; Range of motion; Risk factors

PMID:
28988397
DOI:
10.1007/s00264-017-3657-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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