Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
BMJ Open. 2017 Oct 6;7(10):e015122. doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2016-015122.

Infant BMI peak as a predictor of overweight and obesity at age 2 years in a Chinese community-based cohort.

Sun J1,2, Nwaru BI3,4,5, Hua J6, Li X7, Wu Z1.

Author information

1
Department of Social Medicine, School of Public Health, Collaborative Innovation Center of Social Risks Governance in Health, Fudan University, Shanghai, China.
2
Department of Child Health Care, Jing'an Maternal and Child Health Care Center, Shanghai, China.
3
School of Health Sciences, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland.
4
Asthma UK Centre for Applied Research, Usher Institute of Population Health Sciences and Informatics, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK.
5
Krefting Research Centre, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
6
Department of Maternal and Child Health Care, Shanghai First Maternity and Infant Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China.
7
Department of Health Policy and Management, School of Public Health, Collaborative Innovation Center of Social Risks Governance in Health, Fudan University, Shanghai, China.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Infant body mass index (BMI) peak has proven to be a useful indicator for predicting childhood obesity risk in American and European populations. However, it has not been assessed in China. We characterised infant BMI trajectories in a Chinese longitudinal cohort and evaluated whether BMI peak can predict overweight and obesity at age 2 years.

METHODS:

Serial measurements (n=6-12) of weight and length were taken from healthy term infants (n=2073) in a birth cohort established in urban Shanghai. Measurements were used to estimate BMI growth curves from birth to 13.5 months using a polynomial regression model. BMI peak characteristics, including age (in months) and magnitude (BMI, in kg/m2) at peak and prepeak velocities (in kg/m2/month), were estimated. The relationship between infant BMI peak and childhood BMI at age 2 years was examined using binary logistic analysis.

RESULTS:

Mean age at peak BMI was 7.61 months, with a magnitude of 18.33 kg/m2. Boys (n=1022) had a higher average peak BMI (18.60 vs 18.07 kg/m2, p<0.001) and earlier average achievement of peak value (7.54 vs 7.67 months, p<0.05) than girls (n=1051). With 1 kg/m2 increase in peak BMI and 1 month increase in peak time, the risk of overweight at age 2 years increased by 2.11 times (OR 3.11; 95% CI 2.64 to 3.66) and 35% (OR 1.35; 95% CI 1.21 to 1.50), respectively. Similarly, higher BMI magnitude (OR 2.69; 95% CI 2.00 to 3.61) and later timing of infant BMI peak (OR 1.35; 95% CI 1.08 to 1.68) were associated with an increased risk of childhood obesity at age 2 years.

CONCLUSIONS:

We have shown that infant BMI peak is valuable for predicting early childhood overweight and obesity in urban Shanghai. Because this is the first Chinese community-based cohort study of this nature, future research is required to examine infant populations in other areas of China.

KEYWORDS:

body mass index; infants; longitudinal study; obesity; overweight

PMID:
28988164
DOI:
10.1136/bmjopen-2016-015122
Free full text

Conflict of interest statement

Competing interests: None declared.

PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire
    Loading ...
    Support Center