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Drug Alcohol Depend. 2017 Nov 1;180:427-430. doi: 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2017.09.001. Epub 2017 Sep 28.

A longitudinal study of electronic cigarette use and onset of conventional cigarette smoking and marijuana use among Mexican adolescents.

Author information

1
Health Promotion, Education, and Behavior, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina, USA. Electronic address: lozanop@email.sc.edu.
2
Department of Tobacco Research, Center for Population Health Research National Institute of Public Health, Cuernavaca, Mexico. Electronic address: inti.barrientos@insp.mx.
3
Department of Tobacco Research, Center for Population Health Research National Institute of Public Health, Cuernavaca, Mexico. Electronic address: edna@insp.mx.
4
Department of Health Economy and Society, Centro de Estudios de Estado y Sociedad, Buenos Aires, Argentina. Electronic address: paolamorello@hotmail.com.
5
Department of Health Economy and Society, Centro de Estudios de Estado y Sociedad, Buenos Aires, Argentina. Electronic address: raulmejia@cedes.org.
6
Cancer Control Program, Norris Cotton Cancer Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire, USA. Electronic address: James.D.Sargent@dartmouth.edu.
7
Health Promotion, Education, and Behavior, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina, USA; Department of Tobacco Research, Center for Population Health Research National Institute of Public Health, Cuernavaca, Mexico. Electronic address: thrasher@mailbox.sc.edu.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

This study evaluated whether e-cigarette trial among Mexican adolescents increased the likelihood of trial and use of conventional cigarettes or marijuana use at follow-up.

METHOD:

A school-based longitudinal survey was conducted in 60 public middle schools from the three largest cities in Mexico. Students (12-13years old) were surveyed in 2015 and followed up 20 months later (n=6574). Generalized estimating equations models were used to evaluate the association between e-cigarette trial at baseline and conventional cigarettes smoking and marijuana use at follow-up.

RESULT:

Adolescents who had tried e-cigarettes (but not cigarettes) at baseline were more likely to have tried conventional cigarettes at followup compared to adolescents who had tried neither e-cigarettes nor cigarettes (43% vs. 24%, respectively; RR 1.41, 95% CI 1.18-1.70). We also found that adolescents who had tried both conventional cigarettes and e-cigarettes at baseline were more likely to have tried marijuana at follow-up compared to adolescents who had tried neither tobacco product (20% vs. 4%, respectively; RR 2.67, 95% CI 1.78-4.02). Trial of only e-cigarettes was not independently associated with marijuana use at followup.

CONCLUSIONS:

Adolescents who had tried e-cigarettes were more likely to have tried conventional cigarettes and marijuana 20 months later. Although e-cigarettes have been banned in Mexico, it is likely that additional policies and public health campaigns are needed to reduce adolescent use of e-cigarettes and its consequences.

KEYWORDS:

Adolescents; Electronic cigarettes; Marijuana; Mexico; Trial

PMID:
28988005
PMCID:
PMC5771440
DOI:
10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2017.09.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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