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Methods Mol Biol. 2018;1604:269-278. doi: 10.1007/978-1-4939-6981-4_21.

Testing Experimental Therapies in a Guinea Pig Model for Hemorrhagic Fever.

Wong G1,2,3, Bi Y4, Kobinger G5,6,7,8, Gao GF4, Qiu X9,10.

Author information

1
CAS Key Laboratory of Pathogenic Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China. garyckwong@hotmail.com.
2
Special Pathogens Program, National Microbiology Laboratory, Public Health Agency of Canada, Winnipeg, Canada. garyckwong@hotmail.com.
3
Department of Medical Microbiology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada. garyckwong@hotmail.com.
4
CAS Key Laboratory of Pathogenic Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
5
Special Pathogens Program, National Microbiology Laboratory, Public Health Agency of Canada, Winnipeg, Canada.
6
Department of Medical Microbiology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada.
7
Department of Immunology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada.
8
Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
9
Special Pathogens Program, National Microbiology Laboratory, Public Health Agency of Canada, Winnipeg, Canada. xiangguo.qiu@phac-aspc.gc.ca.
10
Department of Medical Microbiology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada. xiangguo.qiu@phac-aspc.gc.ca.

Abstract

Hemorrhagic fever viruses are among the deadliest pathogens known to humans, and often, licensed medical countermeasures are unavailable to prevent or treat infections. Guinea pigs are a commonly used animal for the preclinical development of any experimental candidates, typically to confirm data generated in mice and as a way to validate and support further testing in nonhuman primates. In this chapter, we use Sudan virus (SUDV), a lethal filovirus closely related to Ebola virus, as an example of the steps required for generating a guinea pig-adapted isolate that is used to test a monoclonal antibody-based therapy against viral hemorrhagic fevers.

KEYWORDS:

Guinea pigs; Hemorrhagic fever; Monoclonal antibodies; Serial passaging; Sudan virus

PMID:
28986842
DOI:
10.1007/978-1-4939-6981-4_21
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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