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Mol Neurobiol. 2018 Jul;55(7):5623-5638. doi: 10.1007/s12035-017-0787-9. Epub 2017 Oct 6.

Anesthetic Isoflurane or Desflurane Plus Surgery Differently Affects Cognitive Function in Alzheimer's Disease Transgenic Mice.

Author information

1
Department of Anesthesia, Beijing Friendship Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, 100050, People's Republic of China.
2
Geriatric Anesthesia Research Unit, Department of Anesthesia, Critical Care and Pain Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 149 13th Street, Room 4310, Charlestown, MA, 02129-2060, USA.
3
Massachusetts General Hospital Biostatistics Center, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, 02114, USA.
4
Department of Psychiatry, Tenth People's Hospital of Tongji University, Shanghai, 200072, People's Republic of China.
5
Department of Anesthesia, Brigham & Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, 02115, USA.
6
Divisions of General Medicine and Primary Care and Gerontology, Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, 02215, USA.
7
Geriatric Anesthesia Research Unit, Department of Anesthesia, Critical Care and Pain Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 149 13th Street, Room 4310, Charlestown, MA, 02129-2060, USA. zxie@mgh.harvard.edu.

Abstract

Anesthesia/surgery could be associated with cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease neuropathogenesis. However, whether surgery under different anesthetics has different effects on cognitive function remains largely unknown. We therefore set out to compare effects of anesthetic isoflurane or desflurane plus surgery on cognitive function and hippocampus levels of synaptic marker (postsynaptic density-95 and synaptophysin) and ATP. Five-month-old AD Transgenic (Tg) (FAD5X) and wild-type male mice received isoflurane or desflurane plus abdominal surgery. We assessed cognitive function in Barnes maze and measured hippocampus levels of postsynaptic density-95, synaptophysin, and ATP in the mice. We determined whether vitamin K2 could mitigate these anesthesia/surgery-induced changes. Isoflurane, but not desflurane, plus surgery increased escape latency and escape distance in Barnes maze probe test and reduced postsynaptic density-95, synaptophysin, and ATP levels as compared to control condition in AD Tg mice. Vitamin K2 attenuated the anesthesia/surgery-induced changes in the AD Tg mice. These findings suggest that isoflurane, but not desflurane, plus surgery might induce cognitive impairment via causing brain energy deficits. Pending confirmative studies in both animals and humans suggest desflurane could be a better choice for AD patients when surgery is needed. Moreover, vitamin K2 could treat cognitive deficiency associated with anesthesia and surgery.

KEYWORDS:

ATP; Alzheimer’s disease; Anesthesia/surgery; Cognitive deficiency; Desflurane; Isoflurane; Synapse; Transgenic mice

PMID:
28986748
PMCID:
PMC5889364
DOI:
10.1007/s12035-017-0787-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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