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Curr Genet. 2018 Apr;64(2):327-333. doi: 10.1007/s00294-017-0754-z. Epub 2017 Oct 5.

Synthetic genome recoding: new genetic codes for new features.

Author information

1
Department of Systems Biology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, 02115, USA.
2
Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering, Harvard University, Boston, MA, 02115, USA.
3
Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, 02138, USA.
4
Department of Systems Biology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, 02115, USA. pamela_silver@hms.harvard.edu.
5
Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering, Harvard University, Boston, MA, 02115, USA. pamela_silver@hms.harvard.edu.

Abstract

Full genome recoding, or rewriting codon meaning, through chemical synthesis of entire bacterial chromosomes has become feasible in the past several years. Recoding an organism can impart new properties including non-natural amino acid incorporation, virus resistance, and biocontainment. The estimated cost of construction that includes DNA synthesis, assembly by recombination, and troubleshooting, is now comparable to costs of early stage development of drugs or other high-tech products. Here, we discuss several recently published assembly methods and provide some thoughts on the future, including how synthetic efforts might benefit from the analysis of natural recoding processes and organisms that use alternative genetic codes.

KEYWORDS:

Alternative genetic code; Editing; Reassignment

PMID:
28983660
PMCID:
PMC5849531
DOI:
10.1007/s00294-017-0754-z
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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