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Schizophr Res. 2018 May;195:306-317. doi: 10.1016/j.schres.2017.09.024. Epub 2017 Oct 3.

The Genetics of Endophenotypes of Neurofunction to Understand Schizophrenia (GENUS) consortium: A collaborative cognitive and neuroimaging genetics project.

Author information

1
Psychiatric and Neurodevelopmental Genetics Unit, Center for Genomic Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, United States; Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, United States; Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States; Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research, Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, MA, United States.
2
Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States; Department of Psychiatry, Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System, Brockton, MA, United States; Psychiatry Neuroimaging Laboratory, Department of Psychiatry, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, United States.
3
Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States; Massachusetts Mental Health Center Public Psychiatry Division, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA, United States.
4
Center for Mind/Brain Sciences (CiMEC), University of Trento, Trento, Italy.
5
Center for Psychiatric Neuroscience, The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Division of Northwell Health, Manhasset, NY, United States; Division of Psychiatry Research, The Zucker Hillside Hospital, Division of Northwell Health, Glen Oaks, NY, United States; Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine, Departments of Psychiatry and Molecular Medicine, Hempstead, NY, United States; BrainWorkup, LLC, Los Angeles, CA, United States.
6
Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States; Massachusetts Mental Health Center Public Psychiatry Division, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA, United States; University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA, United States.
7
Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States; Department of Psychiatry, Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System, Brockton, MA, United States.
8
Department of Psychological Medicine, Cardiff University, Cardiff, United Kingdom.
9
The Mind Research Network, Albuquerque, NM, United States; Department of Psychology and Neuroscience Institute, Georgia State University, GA, United States.
10
Center for Psychiatric Neuroscience, The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Division of Northwell Health, Manhasset, NY, United States; Division of Psychiatry Research, The Zucker Hillside Hospital, Division of Northwell Health, Glen Oaks, NY, United States; Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine, Departments of Psychiatry and Molecular Medicine, Hempstead, NY, United States.
11
Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States; Department of Psychiatry, Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System, Brockton, MA, United States; Psychiatry Neuroimaging Laboratory, Department of Psychiatry, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, United States; Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States.
12
Kimel Family Translational Imaging Genetics Laboratory, Research Imaging Centre, Campbell Family Mental Health Institute, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada; Department of Psychiatry and Institute of Medical Science, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.
13
Department of Psychiatry, Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, University of Halle-Wittenberg, Halle, an der Saale, Germany; Department of Psychiatry, Ludwig Maximilians University, Munich, Germany.
14
Department of Psychiatry, Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, University of Halle-Wittenberg, Halle, an der Saale, Germany.
15
Brain Centre Rudolf Magnus, Department of Psychiatry, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
16
Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, United States; Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States; MGH/HST Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA, United States.
17
Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States; MGH/HST Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA, United States; Division of Psychological & Social Medicine and Developmental Neurosciences, Faculty of Medicine, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, Germany.
18
Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States; Psychiatry Neuroimaging Laboratory, Department of Psychiatry, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, United States.
19
Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology, and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, United Kingdom; National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Mental Health Biomedical Research Centre at South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom.
20
Institute of Mental Health, Woodbridge Hospital, Singapore.
21
The Cognitive Genetics and Cognitive Therapy Group, Department of Psychology, National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland.
22
Neuropsychiatric Genetics Research Group, Department of Psychiatry, Institute of Molecular Medicine, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland; Laboratory of NeuroImaging, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, United States.
23
Psychiatric and Neurodevelopmental Genetics Unit, Center for Genomic Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, United States.
24
Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology, and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, United Kingdom; National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Mental Health Biomedical Research Centre at South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom; Mental Health Neuroscience Research Department, UCL Division of Psychiatry, University College London, United Kingdom.
25
Cognitive Genetics and Cognitive Therapy Group, Neuroimaging and Cognitive Genomics (NICOG) Centre and NCBES Galway Neuroscience Centre, School of Psychology and Discipline of Biochemistry, National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland.
26
Neuropsychiatric Genetics Research Group, Department of Psychiatry, Institute of Molecular Medicine, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
27
Genome Institute, Singapore.
28
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, United States.
29
The Mind Research Network, Albuquerque, NM, United States; Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, United States.
30
Department of Psychiatry, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, United States.
31
Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States; Nathan S. Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research, Department of Psychiatry, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY, United States.
32
Department of Epidemiology, Brown University, Providence, RI, United States.
33
Department of Medicine, Division of Women's Health, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States.
34
Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, United States; Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States; Massachusetts Mental Health Center Public Psychiatry Division, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA, United States.
35
Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States; Psychiatry Neuroimaging Laboratory, Department of Psychiatry, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, United States; Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States; MGH/HST Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA, United States.
36
Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States; Department of Psychiatry, Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System, Brockton, MA, United States; Laboratory of Applied Neuropsychology, University of Massachusetts, Boston, MA, United States.
37
Kimel Family Translational Imaging Genetics Laboratory, Research Imaging Centre, Campbell Family Mental Health Institute, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.
38
Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States; Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research, Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, MA, United States; Department of Psychiatry, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, United States; Division of Psychiatric Genomics, Departments of Psychiatry and Genetics and Genomic Sciences, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, United States.
39
Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology, and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, United Kingdom; Department of Psychology, Bilkent University, Bilkent, Ankara, Turkey; Department of Psychology, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong, SAR, China.
40
Neuropsychiatric Genetics Research Group, Department of Psychiatry, Institute of Molecular Medicine, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland; Cognitive Genetics and Cognitive Therapy Group, Neuroimaging and Cognitive Genomics (NICOG) Centre and NCBES Galway Neuroscience Centre, School of Psychology and Discipline of Biochemistry, National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland.
41
Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, United States; Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States; Department of Medicine, Division of Women's Health, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States; Department of Medicine, Division of Women's Health, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States.
42
Psychiatric and Neurodevelopmental Genetics Unit, Center for Genomic Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, United States; Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, United States; Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States; Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research, Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, MA, United States. Electronic address: tpetryshen@mgh.harvard.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Schizophrenia has a large genetic component, and the pathways from genes to illness manifestation are beginning to be identified. The Genetics of Endophenotypes of Neurofunction to Understand Schizophrenia (GENUS) Consortium aims to clarify the role of genetic variation in brain abnormalities underlying schizophrenia. This article describes the GENUS Consortium sample collection.

METHODS:

We identified existing samples collected for schizophrenia studies consisting of patients, controls, and/or individuals at familial high-risk (FHR) for schizophrenia. Samples had single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array data or genomic DNA, clinical and demographic data, and neuropsychological and/or brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data. Data were subjected to quality control procedures at a central site.

RESULTS:

Sixteen research groups contributed data from 5199 psychosis patients, 4877 controls, and 725 FHR individuals. All participants have relevant demographic data and all patients have relevant clinical data. The sex ratio is 56.5% male and 43.5% female. Significant differences exist between diagnostic groups for premorbid and current IQ (both p<1×10-10). Data from a diversity of neuropsychological tests are available for 92% of participants, and 30% have structural MRI scans (half also have diffusion-weighted MRI scans). SNP data are available for 76% of participants. The ancestry composition is 70% European, 20% East Asian, 7% African, and 3% other.

CONCLUSIONS:

The Consortium is investigating the genetic contribution to brain phenotypes in a schizophrenia sample collection of >10,000 participants. The breadth of data across clinical, genetic, neuropsychological, and MRI modalities provides an important opportunity for elucidating the genetic basis of neural processes underlying schizophrenia.

KEYWORDS:

Cognition; Genetics; MRI; Neuroimaging; Neuropsychology; Schizophrenia

PMID:
28982554
PMCID:
PMC5882601
[Available on 2019-05-01]
DOI:
10.1016/j.schres.2017.09.024

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