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J Am Coll Cardiol. 2017 Oct 10;70(15):1833-1842. doi: 10.1016/j.jacc.2017.08.027.

The Importance of Breakfast in Atherosclerosis Disease: Insights From the PESA Study.

Author information

1
Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares Carlos III, Madrid, Spain.
2
Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares Carlos III, Madrid, Spain; Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. Electronic address: vfuster@cnic.es.
3
Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares Carlos III, Madrid, Spain; CIBER de Enfermedades CardioVasculares, Madrid, Spain; Universidad Complutense, Madrid, Spain; Cardiovascular Institute, IDISSC, Hospital Clínico San Carlos, Madrid, Spain.
4
Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares Carlos III, Madrid, Spain; U.S. Department of Agriculture Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging, Tufts University, Boston, Massachusetts; IMDEA Food Institute, CEI UAM + CSIC, Madrid, Spain.
5
Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares Carlos III, Madrid, Spain; Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York.
6
Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares Carlos III, Madrid, Spain; CIBER de Enfermedades CardioVasculares, Madrid, Spain; HM Hospitales-Centro Integral de Enfermedades Cardiovasculares, Madrid, Spain.
7
Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares Carlos III, Madrid, Spain; HM Hospitales-Centro Integral de Enfermedades Cardiovasculares, Madrid, Spain.
8
Banco de Santander, Madrid, Spain.
9
Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares Carlos III, Madrid, Spain; CIBER de Enfermedades CardioVasculares, Madrid, Spain; IIS-Fundación Jiménez Díaz Hospital, Universidad Autónoma, Madrid, Spain.
10
Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares Carlos III, Madrid, Spain; Universidad Complutense, Madrid, Spain; i+12 Research Institute and Cardiology Department, Hospital 12 de Octubre, Madrid, Spain.
11
Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, Tufts University, Boston, Massachusetts. Electronic address: jose.penalvo@tufts.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Daily habits, including the number and quality of eating occasions, are potential targets for primary prevention strategies with large health impacts. Skipping breakfast is considered a frequent and unhealthy habit associated with an increased cardiovascular (CV) risk.

OBJECTIVES:

The study sought to explore the association between different breakfast patterns and CV risk factors and the presence, distribution, and extension of subclinical atherosclerosis.

METHODS:

Cross-sectional analysis was performed within the PESA (Progression of Early Subclinical Atherosclerosis) study, a prospective cohort of asymptomatic (free of CV events at baseline) adults 40 to 54 years of age. Lifestyle and multivascular imaging data along with clinical covariates were collected from 4,052 participants. Multivariate logistic regression models were used in the analysis.

RESULTS:

Three patterns of breakfast consumption were studied: high-energy breakfast, when contributing to >20% of total daily energy intake (27% of the population); low-energy breakfast, when contributing between 5% and 20% of total daily energy intake (70% of the population); and skipping breakfast, when consuming <5% of total daily energy (3% of the population). Independent of the presence of traditional and dietary CV risk factors, and compared with high-energy breakfast, habitual skipping breakfast was associated with a higher prevalence of noncoronary (odds ratio: 1.55; 95% confidence interval: 0.97 to 2.46) and generalized (odds ratio: 2.57; 95% confidence interval: 1.54 to 4.31) atherosclerosis.

CONCLUSION:

Skipping breakfast is associated with an increased odds of prevalent noncoronary and generalized atherosclerosis independently of the presence of conventional CV risk factors. (Progression of Early Subclinical Atherosclerosis [PESA]; NCT01410318).

KEYWORDS:

atherosclerosis; atherosclerotic plaque; coronary artery calcification; lifestyle; skipping breakfast

PMID:
28982495
DOI:
10.1016/j.jacc.2017.08.027
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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