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Microbiology. 2017 Nov;163(11):1604-1612. doi: 10.1099/mic.0.000542. Epub 2017 Oct 6.

Phosphoglycerate kinase acts as a futile cycle at high temperature.

Author information

1
1​Molecular Enzyme Technology and Biochemistry (MEB), BiofilmCentre, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Duisburg-Essen, Duisburg, Germany.
2
2​Department of Biochemistry, Stellenbosch University, Private Bag X1, Matieland 7602, South Africa.
3
4​MIB, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK.
4
3​Molecular Cell Physiology, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Abstract

In (hyper)thermophilic organisms metabolic processes have to be adapted to function optimally at high temperature. We compared the gluconeogenic conversion of 3-phosphoglycerate via 1,3-bisphosphoglycerate to glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate at 30 °C and at 70 °C. At 30 °C it was possible to produce 1,3-bisphosphoglycerate from 3-phosphoglycerate with phosphoglycerate kinase, but at 70 °C, 1,3-bisphosphoglycerate was dephosphorylated rapidly to 3-phosphoglycerate, effectively turning the phosphoglycerate kinase into a futile cycle. When phosphoglycerate kinase was incubated together with glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase it was possible to convert 3-phosphoglycerate to glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate, both at 30 °C and at 70 °C, however, at 70 °C only low concentrations of product were observed due to thermal instability of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate. Thus, thermolabile intermediates challenge central metabolic reactions and require special adaptation strategies for life at high temperature.

KEYWORDS:

NMR spectroscopy; archaea; gluconeogenesis; kinetic modelling; thermal degradation; thermophiles

PMID:
28982396
DOI:
10.1099/mic.0.000542
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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