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Neurology. 2017 Oct 31;89(18):1923-1925. doi: 10.1212/WNL.0000000000004608. Epub 2017 Oct 4.

Traumatic brain injury may not increase the risk of Alzheimer disease.

Author information

1
From the Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center (M.W.W., D.P.V.), Center for Imaging of Neurodegenerative Diseases, San Francisco, CA; Department of Medicine (P.K.C.), University of Washington, Seattle; Department of Pathology (T.J.M.), Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA; and Department of Neurological Sciences (D.A.B.), Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL. michael.weiner@ucsf.edu.
2
From the Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center (M.W.W., D.P.V.), Center for Imaging of Neurodegenerative Diseases, San Francisco, CA; Department of Medicine (P.K.C.), University of Washington, Seattle; Department of Pathology (T.J.M.), Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA; and Department of Neurological Sciences (D.A.B.), Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL.

Abstract

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) commonly occurs in civilian and military populations. Some epidemiologic studies previously have associated TBI with an increased risk of Alzheimer disease (AD). Recent clinicopathologic and biomarker studies have failed to confirm the relationship of TBI to the development of AD dementia or pathologic changes, and suggest that other neurodegenerative processes might be linked to TBI. Additional studies are required to determine the long-term consequences of TBI.

PMID:
28978654
PMCID:
PMC5664292
DOI:
10.1212/WNL.0000000000004608
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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