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J Public Health (Oxf). 2018 Sep 1;40(3):508-516. doi: 10.1093/pubmed/fdx092.

Active commuting is associated with a lower risk of obesity, diabetes and metabolic syndrome in Chilean adults.

Author information

1
BHF Glasgow Cardiovascular Research Centre, Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Science, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK.
2
Escuela de Educación Física, Universidad San Sebastián, Concepción, Chile.
3
Grupo de Investigación Calidad de Vida, Departamento de Ciencias de la Educación, Facultad de Educación y Humanidades, Universidad del Bio-Bio, Chillan, Chile.
4
Instituto de Farmacia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Austral de Chile, Valdivia, Chile.
5
Instituto de Anatomía, Histología y Patología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Austral de Chile, Valdivia, Chile.
6
Departamento de Educación Física, Facultad de Educación, Universidad de Concepción, Concepción, Chile.
7
Department of Physical Activity Sciences, Research Nucleus in Health, Physical Activity and Sport, Universidad de Los Lagos, Osorno, Chile.
8
Grupo IRyS, Escuela de Educación Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Valparaíso, Chile.
9
Escuela de Kinesiología, Facultad de Salud, Universidad Santo Tomás, Sede Valdivia, Chile.
10
Departamento de Educación Física, Deportes y Recreación, Universidad de La Frontera, Temuco, Chile.
11
Human Nutrition Research Centre, Institute of Cellular Medicine, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.

Abstract

Background:

There is limited evidence on how active commuting is associated with health benefits in developing countries. The aim of this study therefore was to investigate the associations between active commuting and markers of adiposity and cardiometabolic risk in the Chilean adult population.

Methods:

In total, 5157 participants from the Chilean National Health Survey 2009-10 were included in this cross-sectional study. Active commuting was measured using the Global Physical Activity Questionnaire (GPAQ v2). Body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) were measured and used to define obesity and central obesity. Type 2 diabetes (T2D) and metabolic syndrome were determined using WHO and updated ATPIII-NCEP criteria, respectively.

Results:

The main finding of this study is that a 30 min increase in active commuting is associated with lower odds for BMI > 25.0 kg m-2 (0.93 [95% CI: 0.88-0.98, P = 0.010]). Similarly, the odds for central obesity was 0.87 [0.82-0.92, P < 0.0001]. Similar associations were found for T2D (0.81 [0.75-0.88], P < 0.0001) and metabolic syndrome (OR: 0.86 [0.80-0.92], P < 0.0001).

Conclusion:

Our findings show that active commuting is associated with lower adiposity and a healthier metabolic profile including lower risk for obesity, diabetes and metabolic syndrome.

PMID:
28977515
DOI:
10.1093/pubmed/fdx092
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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