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Cancer Causes Control. 2017 Dec;28(12):1405-1416. doi: 10.1007/s10552-017-0968-x. Epub 2017 Oct 3.

Sedentary time and postmenopausal breast cancer incidence.

Author information

1
Department of Oncology, Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University Medical Center, 1000 New Jersey Ave SE, Washington, DC, 20003, USA. sjo36@georgetown.edu.
2
Department of Oncology, Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University Medical Center, 1000 New Jersey Ave SE, Washington, DC, 20003, USA.
3
Department of Health Behavior and Policy, School of Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University, 830 East Main Street, Richmond, VA, 23219, USA.
4
Department of Bioethics and Humanities, University of Washington, Health Sciences Building, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Seattle, WA, 98195, USA.
5
Department of Family Medicine and Public Health, University of California-San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA, 92093, USA.
6
Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Washington, Health Sciences Building, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Seattle, WA, 98195, USA.
7
Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, CA, 90502, USA.
8
Department of Preventive Medicine, The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Doctors Office Building, 66 North Pauline Street, Memphis, TN, 38163, USA.
9
Department of Preventive Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, 680 North Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, IL, 60611, USA.
10
MedStar Health Research Institute, 6525 Belcrest Road, Hyattsville, MD, 20782, USA.
11
Department of Epidemiology and Environmental Health, University at Buffalo, 401 Kimball Tower, Buffalo, NY, 14214, USA.
12
Division of Preventive Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 900 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA, 02215, USA.
13
Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, 677 Huntington Ave, Boston, MA, 02115, USA.
14
Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, 1100 Fairview Ave. N., Seattle, WA, 98109, USA.
15
Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, 370 W 9th Ave, Columbus, OH, 43210, USA.
16
Department of Internal Medicine, University of Florida College of Medicine, 2000 SW Archer Rd, Gainesville, FL, 3260, USA.
17
Department of Medicine, Stanford Prevention Research Center, Stanford University, Stanford, California, 1265 Welch Rd, Palo Alto, CA, 94305, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The objective of this study was to evaluate the prospective association between sedentary time and postmenopausal breast cancer incidence, and whether associations differ by race/ethnicity, physical activity levels, and body measurements.

METHODS:

The Women's Health Initiative Observational Study is a prospective cohort among women ages 50-79 years at baseline (1994-1998) (analytic cohort = 70,233). Baseline questionnaire data were used to estimate time spent sitting and total sedentary time. Associations between time spent sitting and invasive breast cancer incidence overall (n = 4,115 cases through September 2015), and by hormone receptor subtypes, were investigated using Cox proportional hazards regression. Analyses were replicated stratified by race/ethnicity, body measurements, and physical activity.

RESULTS:

Among women in this study, 34.5% reported ≤ 5 h/day sitting, 40.9% reported 6-9 h/day and 24.7% reported ≥ 10 h/day. Time spent sitting (≥ 10 vs. ≤5 h/day adjusted HR = 1.00, 95% CI 0.92-1.09) was not associated with breast cancer incidence, regardless of hormone receptor subtype. Associations did not differ by race/ethnicity, physical activity, or body measurements.

CONCLUSIONS:

Results from this study do not support an association between sedentary time and breast cancer incidence.

KEYWORDS:

Body composition; Breast cancer; Physical activity; Sedentary; Sitting time

PMID:
28975422
PMCID:
PMC5687985
DOI:
10.1007/s10552-017-0968-x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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