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Br J Cancer. 2017 Dec 5;117(12):1883-1887. doi: 10.1038/bjc.2017.350. Epub 2017 Oct 3.

30 years follow-up and increased risks of breast cancer and leukaemia after long-term low-dose-rate radiation exposure.

Author information

1
Department of Public Health, Tzu Chi University, Hualien 970, Taiwan.
2
Institute of Public Health, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan.
3
School of Oral Hygiene, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan.
4
Department of Nursing, Kang-Ning University, Taipei 114, Taiwan.
5
Taipei Hospital, Ministry of Health and Welfare, New Taipei City 242, Taiwan.
6
National Health Research Institute, Miaoli 350, Taiwan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The current study followed-up site-specific cancer risks in an unique cohort with 30 years' follow-up after long-term low-dose-rate radiation exposure in Taiwan.

METHODS:

Six thousand two hundred and forty two Taiwanese people received extra exposure in residential and school buildings constructed with Co-60-contaminated steel from 1982 until informed and relocated in early 1990s. The additional doses received have been estimated. During 1983-2012, 300 cancer cases were identified through the national cancer registry in Taiwan, 247 cases with minimum latent periods from initial exposure. The hazard ratios (HR) of site-specific cancers were estimated with additional cumulative exposure estimated individually.

RESULTS:

Dose-dependent risks were statistically significantly increased for leukaemia excluding chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (HR100mSv 1.18; 90% CI 1.04-1.28), breast cancers (HR100mSv 1.11; 90% CI 1.05-1.20), and all cancers (HR100mSv 1.05; 90% CI 1.0-1.08, P=0.04). Women with an initial age of exposure lower than 20 were shown with dose response increase in breast cancers risks (HR100mSv 1.38; 90% CI 1.14-1.60; P=0.0008).

CONCLUSIONS:

Radiation exposure before age 20 was associated with a significantly increased risk of breast cancer at much lower radiation exposure than observed previously.

PMID:
28972968
PMCID:
PMC5729469
DOI:
10.1038/bjc.2017.350
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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