Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Adv Exp Med Biol. 2017;987:161-175. doi: 10.1007/978-3-319-57379-3_15.

Clinical Simulation Training in Geriatric Medicine: A Review of the Evidence and Lessons for Training in Psychiatry of Old Age.

Plakiotis C1,2,3,4.

Author information

1
Monash Ageing Research Centre (MONARC), Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Chris.Plakiotis@monash.edu.
2
Department of Psychiatry, School of Clinical Sciences at Monash Health, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Chris.Plakiotis@monash.edu.
3
Aged Persons Mental Health Service, Monash Health, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Chris.Plakiotis@monash.edu.
4
Aged Psychiatry Academic Unit (Monash University), c/o Medical Administration, Kingston Centre, Warrigal Road, Cheltenham, VIC, 3192, Australia. Chris.Plakiotis@monash.edu.

Abstract

Clinical simulation encompasses a broad range of methods and techniques that allow clinical skills to be rehearsed and practiced away from the clinic before being applied to real patients. As such, preparation of doctors and other healthcare professionals for safe clinical practice is one of its main aims. The objective of this paper was to review the evidence regarding the use of clinical simulation training in geriatric medicine education and consider how the findings may be translated to education in the closely related field of psychiatry of old age. Original papers and descriptive case studies of clinical simulation training programs for medical professionals were considered for inclusion. Papers were grouped according to the participants' level of training: (1) undergraduate medical education; (2) postgraduate medical education; and (3) multiple levels of medical learners. A diverse range of effective simulation modalities for teaching geriatric medicine was identified across all levels of learning. The evidence suggests that there is much fertile ground for trainees in geriatric medicine and psychiatry of old age to participate in joint simulation training programs, thereby maximising their reach while minimising associated resource requirements and financials costs. Given the prominent position of psychiatry of old age at the interface between psychiatry and medicine, old age psychiatrists potentially have much to offer in advancing the field of clinical simulation while simultaneously improving patient care.

KEYWORDS:

Clinical simulation; Geriatric medicine; Medical education; Old age; Psychiatry

PMID:
28971456
DOI:
10.1007/978-3-319-57379-3_15
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer
Loading ...
Support Center