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Mol Imaging Biol. 2018 Feb;20(1):4-20. doi: 10.1007/s11307-017-1123-5.

Combined PET/MRI: Global Warming-Summary Report of the 6th International Workshop on PET/MRI, March 27-29, 2017, Tübingen, Germany.

Author information

1
Department of Nuclear Medicine, Royal North Shore Hospital, and Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia.
2
Werner Siemens Imaging Center, Department of Preclinical Imaging and Radiopharmacy, Eberhard-Karls-Universität, Tübingen, Germany.
3
Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany.
4
Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Medical Faculty, University Dusseldorf, 40225, Dusseldorf, Germany.
5
Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany.
6
Division of Cancer Imaging Research, Department of Radiology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, 21205, USA.
7
Praxis für Humangenetik Tübingen, Paul-Ehrlich-Str. 23, 72076, Tübingen, Germany.
8
Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS) and Bio-X, Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA.
9
Department of Internal Medicine I, Eberhard-Karls University, Tübingen, Germany.
10
Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.
11
Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich, Germany.
12
Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, Eberhard Karls University, Hoppe-Seyler-Straße 3, 72076, Tübingen, Germany.
13
Cancer Research UK Cambridge Institute, Li Ka Shing Centre, Robinson Way, Cambridge, CB2 0RE, UK.
14
Department of Biochemistry, University of Cambridge, Tennis Court Road, Cambridge, CB2 1GA, UK.
15
Department of Biomedical Sciences, Humanitas University, Milan, Italy.
16
Department of Nuclear Medicine, Humanitas Research Hospital, Milan, Italy.
17
Department of Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Clinical Molecular Imaging, Eberhard-Karls-Universität, Tübingen, Germany.
18
Department of Cancer Imaging and Metabolism, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL, 33621, USA.
19
Cancer Imaging, School of Biomedical Engineering & Imaging Sciences, King's College London, London, UK.
20
Department of Radiology, Guy's & St Thomas' Hospitals London, London, UK.
21
GE Healthcare GmbH, Beethovenstrasse 239, Solingen, Germany.
22
Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-Guided Therapy, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
23
New Oncology GmbH, Köln, Germany.
24
Neurobiology Research Unit, Rigshospitalet and Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
25
III. Medical Department, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich, Germany.
26
Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
27
Knight Alzheimer Disease Research Center, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, USA.
28
Nuclear Medicine & Molecular Imaging, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
29
Department of Pediatrics, Center for Infection and Inflammation Imaging Research, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA.
30
Institute of Tumor Biology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.
31
High Field and Hybrid MR Imaging, University Hospital Essen, Essen, Germany.
32
Erwin L. Hahn Institute for MR Imaging, University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany.
33
Department of Radiation Sciences, Umea University, Umea, Sweden.
34
OncoRay-National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Dresden, Germany.
35
Institute of Radiooncology-OncoRay, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden, Germany.
36
Department of Radiotherapy, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus and Medical Faculty of Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, Germany.
37
German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Partner Site Dresden, Dresden, Germany.
38
High Field Magnetic Resonance, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Tübingen, Germany.
39
Department of Internal Medicine VIII, University Hospital Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany.
40
QIMP Group, Center for Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering General Hospital Vienna, Medical University Vienna, 4L, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090, Vienna, Austria. thomas.beyer@meduniwien.ac.at.

Abstract

The 6th annual meeting to address key issues in positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was held again in Tübingen, Germany, from March 27 to 29, 2017. Over three days of invited plenary lectures, round table discussions and dialogue board deliberations, participants critically assessed the current state of PET/MRI, both clinically and as a research tool, and attempted to chart future directions. The meeting addressed the use of PET/MRI and workflows in oncology, neurosciences, infection, inflammation and chronic pain syndromes, as well as deeper discussions about how best to characterise the tumour microenvironment, optimise the complementary information available from PET and MRI, and how advanced data mining and bioinformatics, as well as information from liquid biomarkers (circulating tumour cells and nucleic acids) and pathology, can be integrated to give a more complete characterisation of disease phenotype. Some issues that have dominated previous meetings, such as the accuracy of MR-based attenuation correction (AC) of the PET scan, were finally put to rest as having been adequately addressed for the majority of clinical situations. Likewise, the ability to standardise PET systems for use in multicentre trials was confirmed, thus removing a perceived barrier to larger clinical imaging trials. The meeting openly questioned whether PET/MRI should, in all cases, be used as a whole-body imaging modality or whether in many circumstances it would best be employed to give an in-depth study of previously identified disease in a single organ or region. The meeting concluded that there is still much work to be done in the integration of data from different fields and in developing a common language for all stakeholders involved. In addition, the participants advocated joint training and education for individuals who engage in routine PET/MRI. It was agreed that PET/MRI can enhance our understanding of normal and disrupted biology, and we are in a position to describe the in vivo nature of disease processes, metabolism, evolution of cancer and the monitoring of response to pharmacological interventions and therapies. As such, PET/MRI is a key to advancing medicine and patient care.

KEYWORDS:

Hybrid imaging; Infection; Inflammation; MR-PET; MRI; Molecular imaging; Multi-parametric imaging; Neurology; Oncology; PET; PET/CT; PET/MRI; Quantification

PMID:
28971346
PMCID:
PMC5775351
DOI:
10.1007/s11307-017-1123-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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