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Ann Rehabil Med. 2017 Aug;41(4):539-546. doi: 10.5535/arm.2017.41.4.539. Epub 2017 Aug 31.

Effect of Robot-Assisted Game Training on Upper Extremity Function in Stroke Patients.

Author information

1
Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and Regional Cardiocerebrovascular Center, Dong-A University College of Medicine, Busan, Korea.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the effects of combining robot-assisted game training with conventional upper extremity rehabilitation training (RCT) on motor and daily functions in comparison with conventional upper extremity rehabilitation training (OCT) in stroke patients.

METHODS:

Subjects were eligible if they were able to perform the robot-assisted game training and were divided randomly into a RCT and an OCT group. The RCT group performed one daily session of 30 minutes of robot-assisted game training with a rehabilitation robot, plus one daily session of 30 minutes of conventional rehabilitation training, 5 days a week for 2 weeks. The OCT group performed two daily sessions of 30 minutes of conventional rehabilitation training. The effects of training were measured by a Manual Function Test (MFT), Manual Muscle Test (MMT), Korean version of the Modified Barthel Index (K-MBI) and a questionnaire about satisfaction with training. These measurements were taken before and after the 2-week training.

RESULTS:

Both groups contained 25 subjects. After training, both groups showed significant improvements in motor and daily functions measured by MFT, MMT, and K-MBI compared to the baseline. Both groups demonstrated similar training effects, except motor power of wrist flexion. Patients in the RCT group were more satisfied than those in the OCT group.

CONCLUSION:

There were no significant differences in changes in most of the motor and daily functions between the two types of training. However, patients in the RCT group were more satisfied than those in the OCT group. Therefore, RCT could be a useful upper extremity rehabilitation training method.

KEYWORDS:

Rehabilitation; Robotics; Stroke; Upper extremity; Video games

Conflict of interest statement

CONFLICT OF INTEREST: No potential conflict of interest relevant to this article was reported.

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