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Asian J Transfus Sci. 2017 Jul-Dec;11(2):180-187. doi: 10.4103/0973-6247.214348.

Transfusion-related adverse reactions in pediatric and surgical patients at a tertiary care teaching hospital in India.

Author information

1
Department of Pharmacology, B.J. Medical College and Civil Hospital, Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India.
2
Department of Paediatrics, B.J. Medical College and Civil Hospital, Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India.
3
Department of Surgery, B.J. Medical College and Civil Hospital, Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India.
4
Department of Immunohematology and Blood Transfusion, B.J. Medical College and Civil Hospital, Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Use of blood and its components is lifesaving. However, their use is often associated with adverse events.

OBJECTIVE:

To analyze the pattern of adverse reactions associated with transfusion of blood and its components in pediatric and surgical patients at a tertiary care teaching hospital.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Patients receiving transfusion of blood or its components in a randomly selected unit each from Departments of Pediatrics, including thalassemia OPD and surgery, were monitored intensively for a period of 6 months. Clinical course, management, outcome, causality, severity, seriousness, and preventability of observed transfusion reactions (TRs) were analyzed.

RESULTS:

A total of 411 pediatric and 433 surgical patients received 594 and 745 transfusions respectively during the study period. Of these, TRs were observed in 69 (11.6%) children and 63 (8.4%) surgical patients. Majority of reactions in children (48, 69.5%) and surgical patients (51, 80.9%) were acute, developing within 24 h of transfusion. TRs were observed with packed cells (13.2%), cryoprecipitate (10%), platelet concentrate (14.3%) and fresh frozen plasma (1.3%) in pediatric patients and with packed cells (7.2%), whole blood (25%) and platelet concentrate (62.5%) in surgical patients. Most common TRs included febrile nonhemolytic TRs (FNHTRs) and allergic reactions. Reactions were more frequent in patients with a previous history of transfusion or those receiving more than one transfusion and in children, when transfusion was initiated after 30 min of issue of blood component. Majority of reactions were managed with symptomatic treatment, were nonserious, moderately severe, probably preventable and probably associated with the suspect blood component in both populations.

CONCLUSION:

Transfusion reactions in children and surgical patients are commonly observed with cellular blood components. Majority of reactions are acute and nonserious. FNHTRs and allergic reactions are the most common transfusion reactions. Risk of transfusion reactions is more in patients receiving multiple transfusions.

KEYWORDS:

Allergic reaction; febrile nonhemolytic transfusion reaction; intensive monitoring; pediatric patients; surgical patients; transfusion reactions

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