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Int J Med Microbiol. 2018 Jan;308(1):118-128. doi: 10.1016/j.ijmm.2017.09.009. Epub 2017 Sep 14.

Shaping the niche in macrophages: Genetic diversity of the M. tuberculosis complex and its consequences for the infected host.

Author information

1
Microbial Interface Biology, Research Center Borstel, Leibniz Center for Medicine and Biosciences, 23845 Borstel, Germany; German Center for Infection Research (DZIF), Partner Site Hamburg-Lübeck-Borstel, Parkallee 1-40, 23845, Borstel, Germany. Electronic address: nreiling@fz-borstel.de.
2
Molecular and Experimental Mycobacteriology, Research Center Borstel, Leibniz Center for Medicine and Biosciences, 23845 Borstel, Germany.
3
Molecular and Experimental Mycobacteriology, Research Center Borstel, Leibniz Center for Medicine and Biosciences, 23845 Borstel, Germany; German Center for Infection Research (DZIF), Partner Site Hamburg-Lübeck-Borstel, Parkallee 1-40, 23845, Borstel, Germany.
4
Microbial Interface Biology, Research Center Borstel, Leibniz Center for Medicine and Biosciences, 23845 Borstel, Germany.
5
Institute of Immunology, Christian-Albrechts-University of Kiel, 24109 Kiel, Germany.

Abstract

Pathogenic mycobacteria of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) have co-evolved with their individual hosts and are able to transform the hostile environment of the macrophage into a permissive cellular habitat. The impact of MTBC genetic variability has long been considered largely unimportant in TB pathogenesis. Members of the MTBC can now be distinguished into three major phylogenetic groups consisting of 7 phylogenetic lineages and more than 30 so called sub-lineages/subgroups. MTBC genetic diversity indeed influences the transmissibility and virulence of clinical MTBC isolates as well as the immune response and the clinical outcome. Here we review the genetic diversity and epidemiology of MTBC strains and describe the current knowledge about the host immune response to infection with MTBC clinical isolates using human and murine experimental model systems in vivo and in vitro. We discuss the role of innate cytokines in detail and portray two in our group recently developed approaches to characterize the intracellular niches of MTBC strains. Characterizing the niches and deciphering the strategies of MTBC strains to transform an antibacterial effector cell into a permissive cellular habitat offers the opportunity to identify strain- and lineage-specific key factors which may represent targets for novel antimicrobial or host directed therapies for tuberculosis.

KEYWORDS:

Clinical isolates; Genetic diversity; Glycolysis; Innate cytokines; Lipid droplets; Macrophage; Metabolic labeling; Metabolism; Mycobacteria; Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC); Niche; Phagosome; Phagosome isolation; Type I interferon

PMID:
28969988
DOI:
10.1016/j.ijmm.2017.09.009

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