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J Infect Dis. 2017 Dec 5;216(10):1205-1209. doi: 10.1093/infdis/jix476.

The Impact of Human Papillomavirus Catch-Up Vaccination in Australia: Implications for Introduction of Multiple Age Cohort Vaccination and Postvaccination Data Interpretation.

Author information

1
Centre de Recherche du CHU de Québec-Université Laval, Canada.
2
National HPV Vaccination Program Register, Victorian Cytology Service, Melbourne, Australia.
3
School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
4
The Kirby Institute, UNSW Sydney, Australia.
5
Melbourne Sexual Health Centre and Central Clinical School Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.
6
Université Laval, Québec, Canada.
7
Imperial College, London, United Kingdom.

Abstract

We used transmission-dynamic modeling to estimate the added effectiveness of vaccinating multiple cohorts of females (12-26 years) in Australia compared with the theoretical introduction of routine-only (12-13 years) vaccination. Our results suggest that vaccinating multiple cohorts produced markedly faster direct/herd effects, and it added benefits that last for 20-70 years. Furthermore, the number needed to vaccinate to prevent 1 anogential warts (AGW) case or cervical cancer (CC) was similar for routine + catch-up (AGW = 9.9, CC = 678) and routine-only vaccination (AGW = 9.9, CC = 677), thus providing similar levels of efficiency per person vaccinated.

KEYWORDS:

anogenital warts; cervical cancers; human papillomavirus; mathematical modeling; vaccination

PMID:
28968800
PMCID:
PMC5853481
DOI:
10.1093/infdis/jix476
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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