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Nat Mater. 2017 Nov;16(11):1090-1095. doi: 10.1038/nmat4987. Epub 2017 Sep 25.

Evidence for magnetic Weyl fermions in a correlated metal.

Author information

1
Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8581, Japan.
2
CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), 4-1-8 Honcho Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012, Japan.
3
RIKEN Center for Emergent Matter Science (CEMS), 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198, Japan.
4
Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jl. Ganesha 10, 40132 Bandung, Indonesia.
5
Condensed Matter Theory Center and Joint Quantum Institute, Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742- 4111, USA.
6
Department of Physics and Astronomy, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, Illinois 60208, USA.
7
Department of Physics, Osaka University, Machikaneyama-cho, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043, Japan.
8
Institute of Materials Structure Science, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801, Japan.
9
Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie, Elektronenspeicherring BESSY II, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 15, 12489 Berlin, Germany.
10
Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI), 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198, Japan.

Abstract

Weyl fermions have been observed as three-dimensional, gapless topological excitations in weakly correlated, inversion-symmetry-breaking semimetals. However, their realization in spontaneously time-reversal-symmetry-breaking phases of strongly correlated materials has so far remained hypothetical. Here, we report experimental evidence for magnetic Weyl fermions in Mn3Sn, a non-collinear antiferromagnet that exhibits a large anomalous Hall effect, even at room temperature. Detailed comparison between angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) measurements and density functional theory (DFT) calculations reveals significant bandwidth renormalization and damping effects due to the strong correlation among Mn 3d electrons. Magnetotransport measurements provide strong evidence for the chiral anomaly of Weyl fermions-namely, the emergence of positive magnetoconductance only in the presence of parallel electric and magnetic fields. Since weak magnetic fields (approximately 10 mT) are adequate to control the distribution of Weyl points and the large fictitious fields (equivalent to approximately a few hundred T) produced by them in momentum space, our discovery lays the foundation for a new field of science and technology involving the magnetic Weyl excitations of strongly correlated electron systems such as Mn3Sn.

PMID:
28967918
DOI:
10.1038/nmat4987

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