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J Pediatr Urol. 2018 Feb;14(1):20-24. doi: 10.1016/j.jpurol.2017.08.002. Epub 2017 Sep 8.

Reduction and standardization of surgical instruments in pediatric inguinal hernia repair.

Author information

1
Section of Pediatric Urology, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; The Institute of Health Policy, Management, and Evaluation (IHPME), The University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Electronic address: martin.koyle@sickkids.ca.
2
Section of Pediatric Urology, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
3
Department of Perioperative Services, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
4
Boston University, Boston, MA, USA.
5
The Institute of Health Policy, Management, and Evaluation (IHPME), The University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Abstract

AIM:

To standardize and reduce surgical instrumentation by >25% within a 9-month period for pediatric inguinal hernia repair (PIHR), using "improvement science" methodology.

METHODS:

We prospectively evaluated instruments used for PIHR in 56 consecutive cases by individual surgeons across two separate subspecialties, pediatric surgery (S) and pediatric urology (U), to measure actual number of instruments used compared with existing practice based on preference cards. Based on this evaluation, a single preference card was developed using only instruments that had been used in >50% of all cases. A subsequent series of 52 cases was analyzed to assess whether the new tray contained the ideal instrumentation. Cycle time (CT), to sterilize and package the instruments, and weights of the trays were measured before and after the intervention. A survey of operating room (OR) nurses and U and S surgeons was conducted before and after the introduction of the standardized tray to assess the impact and perception of standardization.

RESULTS:

Prior to creating the standardized tray, a U PIHR tray contained 96 instruments with a weight of 13.5 lbs, while the S set contained 51, weighing 11.2 lbs. The final standardized set comprised 28 instruments and weighed 7.8 lbs. Of 52 PIHRs performed after standardization, in three (6%) instances additional instruments were requested. CT was reduced from 11 to 8 min (U and S respectively) to <5 min for the single tray. Nurses and surgeons reported that quality, safety, and efficiency were improved, and that efforts should continue to standardize instrumentation for other common surgeries.

CONCLUSIONS:

Standardization of surgical equipment can be employed across disciplines with the potential to reduce costs and positively impact quality, safety, and efficiencies.

KEYWORDS:

Hernia; Instrumentation; Pediatric; Quality; Safety; Standardization

PMID:
28967607
DOI:
10.1016/j.jpurol.2017.08.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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