Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Psychiatr Serv. 2017 Nov 1;68(11):1098-1100. doi: 10.1176/appi.ps.201700128. Epub 2017 Oct 2.

No-Show Rates When Phone Appointment Reminders Are Not Directly Delivered.

Author information

1
Dr. Teo and Dr. Dobscha are with the Department of Psychiatry, Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU), Portland, and with the Health Services Research and Development Service (HSR&D) Center to Improve Veteran Involvement in Care, Veterans Affairs (VA) Portland Health Care System, Portland, Oregon. Mr. Forsberg is with the Seattle Epidemiologic Research and Information Center, VA Puget Sound Health Care System, Seattle. He is also with the HSR&D Center to Improve Veteran Involvement in Care, VA Portland Health Care System, where Ms. Marsh and Dr. Saha are affiliated. Dr. Saha is also with the Department of Internal Medicine, OHSU.

Abstract

Promoting patient engagement in treatment and reducing frequency of missed appointments result in higher value through both improved outcomes and improved efficiency. For this reason, continuous quality improvement (CQI) efforts to increase engagement are important in service operations. This column illustrates the results of a CQI study to determine the impact of method of delivery of phone appointment reminders on attendance rates for a cohort of 250 primary care patients with depression. Results indicated that the type of reminder had a significant impact on attendance. Live reminders had the lowest no-show rate (3%), then message or voice mail reminders (24%) and no answer (39%). These findings illustrate the value of CQI efforts for even such basic interventions as appointment reminders. Appointment attendance rates were considerably higher when there was a live contact. CQI efforts related to reminders therefore may benefit from rapid change cycles that incorporate monitoring of the type of reminder delivery and that continuously seek better strategies for engagement.

KEYWORDS:

No-show; PDSA; Primary care; Quality improvement; Veterans issues

PMID:
28967322
DOI:
10.1176/appi.ps.201700128
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Atypon
Loading ...
Support Center