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Biol Psychol. 2017 Oct;129:324-348. doi: 10.1016/j.biopsycho.2017.09.013. Epub 2017 Sep 28.

Electrocortical measures of information processing biases in social anxiety disorder: A review.

Author information

1
Developmental and Educational Psychology, Leiden University, Wassenaarseweg 52, 2333 AK Leiden, The Netherlands; Leiden Institute for Brain and Cognition, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9600, 2300 RC, Leiden, The Netherlands. Electronic address: anitaharrewijn@gmail.com.
2
Department of Psychology, Neuroscience & Behaviour, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4K1, Canada. Electronic address: schmidtl@mcmaster.ca.
3
Developmental and Educational Psychology, Leiden University, Wassenaarseweg 52, 2333 AK Leiden, The Netherlands; Leiden Institute for Brain and Cognition, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9600, 2300 RC, Leiden, The Netherlands. Electronic address: westenberg@fsw.leidenuniv.nl.
4
Department of Psychology, Neuroscience & Behaviour, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4K1, Canada. Electronic address: tanga6@mcmaster.ca.
5
Developmental and Educational Psychology, Leiden University, Wassenaarseweg 52, 2333 AK Leiden, The Netherlands; Leiden Institute for Brain and Cognition, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9600, 2300 RC, Leiden, The Netherlands. Electronic address: m.j.w.van.der.molen@fsw.leidenuniv.nl.

Abstract

Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is characterized by information processing biases, however, their underlying neural mechanisms remain poorly understood. The goal of this review was to give a comprehensive overview of the most frequently studied EEG spectral and event-related potential (ERP) measures in social anxiety during rest, anticipation, stimulus processing, and recovery. A Web of Science search yielded 35 studies reporting on electrocortical measures in individuals with social anxiety or related constructs. Social anxiety was related to increased delta-beta cross-frequency correlation during anticipation and recovery, and information processing biases during early processing of faces (P1) and errors (error-related negativity). These electrocortical measures are discussed in relation to the persistent cycle of information processing biases maintaining SAD. Future research should further investigate the mechanisms of this persistent cycle and study the utility of electrocortical measures in early detection, prevention, treatment and endophenotype research.

KEYWORDS:

Delta-beta correlation; EEG; ERN; Event-related potentials; Information processing biases; P1; P2; Social anxiety disorder; Spectral measures

PMID:
28964790
DOI:
10.1016/j.biopsycho.2017.09.013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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