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J Autoimmun. 2018 Jan;86:104-115. doi: 10.1016/j.jaut.2017.09.002. Epub 2017 Sep 28.

Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein-specific antibodies from multiple sclerosis patients exacerbate disease in a humanized mouse model.

Author information

1
Department of Molecular and Cellular Medicine, Texas A&M University Health Science Center, 469 Joe H. Reynolds Medical Sciences Building, 1114 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843, USA; Department of Microbial Pathogenesis and Immunology, Texas A&M University Health Science Center, 3107 Medical Research & Education Building, 8447 State Hwy 47, Bryan, TX 77807, USA.
2
Department of Molecular and Cellular Medicine, Texas A&M University Health Science Center, 469 Joe H. Reynolds Medical Sciences Building, 1114 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843, USA; Department of Microbial Pathogenesis and Immunology, Texas A&M University Health Science Center, 3107 Medical Research & Education Building, 8447 State Hwy 47, Bryan, TX 77807, USA; Biomedical Engineering Graduate Program, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, 5232 Harry Hines Boulevard, Dallas, TX 75390, USA.
3
Department of Neurology and Neurotherapeutics, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, 5323 Harry Hines Boulevard, Dallas, TX 75390, USA.
4
Department of Molecular and Cellular Medicine, Texas A&M University Health Science Center, 469 Joe H. Reynolds Medical Sciences Building, 1114 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843, USA; Department of Biomedical Engineering, Texas A&M University, 5045 Emerging Technologies Building, 3120 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843, USA.
5
Department of Molecular and Cellular Medicine, Texas A&M University Health Science Center, 469 Joe H. Reynolds Medical Sciences Building, 1114 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843, USA; Department of Microbial Pathogenesis and Immunology, Texas A&M University Health Science Center, 3107 Medical Research & Education Building, 8447 State Hwy 47, Bryan, TX 77807, USA. Electronic address: sally.ward@medicine.tamhsc.edu.

Abstract

Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) is exposed on the outer surface of the myelin sheath, and as such, represents a possible target antigen for antibodies in multiple sclerosis (MS) and other demyelinating diseases. However, despite extensive analyses, whether MOG-specific antibodies contribute to pathogenesis in human MS remains an area of uncertainty. In the current study we demonstrate that antibodies derived from adult MS patients exacerbate experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in 'humanized' mice that transgenically express human FcγRs (hFcγRs). Importantly, this exacerbation is dependent on MOG recognition by the human-derived antibodies. The use of mice that express hFcγRs has allowed us to also investigate the contribution of these receptors to disease in the absence of confounding effects of cross-species differences. Specifically, by engineering the Fc region of MOG-specific antibodies to modulate FcγR and complement (C1q) binding, we reveal that FcγRs but not complement activation contribute to EAE pathogenesis. Importantly, selective enhancement of the affinities of these antibodies for specific FcγRs reveals that FcγRIIA is more important than FcγRIIIA in mediating disease exacerbation. These studies not only provide definitive evidence for the contribution of MOG-specific antibodies to MS, but also reveal mechanistic insight that could lead to new therapeutic targets.

KEYWORDS:

Autoantibodies; EAE; Fc engineering; Fcγ receptors; MOG; MS

PMID:
28964723
DOI:
10.1016/j.jaut.2017.09.002
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