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Value Health. 2017 Sep;20(8):1198-1209. doi: 10.1016/j.jval.2017.04.004. Epub 2017 May 12.

A Systematic Review of the Economic Evidence for Home Support Interventions in Dementia.

Author information

1
Personal Social Services Research Unit (PSSRU), Division of Population Health, Health Services Research and Primary Care, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK. Electronic address: paul.clarkson@manchester.ac.uk.
2
Division of Population Health, Health Services Research and Primary Care, Centre for Health Economics, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK.
3
Personal Social Services Research Unit (PSSRU), Division of Population Health, Health Services Research and Primary Care, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Recent evidence signals the need for effective forms of home support to people with dementia and their carers. The cost-effectiveness evidence of different approaches to support is scant.

OBJECTIVES:

To appraise economic evidence on the cost-effectiveness of home support interventions for dementia to inform future evaluation.

METHODS:

A systematic literature review of full and partial economic evaluations was performed using the British National Health Service Economic Evaluation Database supplemented by additional references. Study characteristics and findings, including incremental cost-effectiveness ratios, when available, were summarized narratively. Study quality was appraised using the National Health Service Economic Evaluation Database critical appraisal criteria and independent ratings, agreed by two reviewers. Studies were located on a permutation matrix describing their mix of incremental costs/effects to aid decision making.

RESULTS:

Of the 151 articles retrieved, 14 studies met the inclusion criteria: 8 concerning support to people with dementia and 6 to carers. Five studies were incremental cost-utility analyses, seven were cost-effectiveness analyses, and two were cost consequences analyses. Five studies expressed incremental cost-effectiveness ratios as cost per quality-adjusted life-year (£6,696-£207,942 per quality-adjusted life-year). In four studies, interventions were dominant over usual care. Two interventions were more costly but more beneficial and were favorable against current acceptability thresholds.

CONCLUSIONS:

Occupational therapy, home-based exercise, and a carers' coping intervention emerged as cost-effective approaches for which there was better evidence. These interventions used environmental modifications, behavior management, physical activity, and emotional support as active components. More robust evidence is needed to judge the value of these and other interventions across the dementia care pathway.

KEYWORDS:

cost measurement; dementia; economic review; home support

PMID:
28964453
DOI:
10.1016/j.jval.2017.04.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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