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Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1988 May;85(9):3090-4.

Nonrandom X chromosome inactivation in B cells from carriers of X chromosome-linked severe combined immunodeficiency.

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1
Department of Pediatrics, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, PA.

Abstract

X chromosome-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (XSCID) is characterized by markedly reduced numbers of T cells, the absence of proliferative responses to mitogens, and hypogammaglobulinemia but normal or elevated numbers of B cells. To determine if the failure of the B cells to produce immunoglobulin might be due to expression of the XSCID gene defect in B-lineage cells as well as T cells, we analyzed patterns of X chromosome inactivation in B cells from nine obligate carriers of this disorder. A series of somatic cell hybrids that selectively retained the active X chromosome was produced from Epstein-Barr virus-stimulated B cells from each woman. To distinguish between the two X chromosomes, the hybrids from each woman were analyzed using an X-linked restriction fragment length polymorphism for which the woman in question was heterozygous. In all obligate carriers of XSCID, the B-cell hybrids demonstrated preferential use of a single X chromosome, the nonmutant X, as the active X. To determine if the small number of B-cell hybrids that contained the mutant X were derived from an immature subset of B cells, lymphocytes from three carriers were separated into surface IgM positive and surface IgM negative B cells prior to exposure to Epstein-Barr virus and production of B-cell hybrids. The results demonstrated normal random X chromosome inactivation in B-cell hybrids derived from the less mature surface IgM positive B cells. In contrast, the pattern of X chromosome inactivation in the surface IgM negative B cells, which had undergone further replication and differentiation, was significantly nonrandom in all three experiments [logarithm of odds (lod) score greater than 3.0]. These results suggest that the XSCID gene product has a direct effect on B cells as well as T cells and is required during B-cell maturation.

PMID:
2896355
PMCID:
PMC280149
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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