Format

Send to

Choose Destination
EMBO J. 2017 Nov 15;36(22):3292-3308. doi: 10.15252/embj.201696056. Epub 2017 Sep 28.

A novel microglial subset plays a key role in myelinogenesis in developing brain.

Author information

1
Department of Neurobiology Research, Institute for Molecular Medicine, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
2
Department of Neuroscience, Medical Physiology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.
3
Institute for Anatomy, University of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany.
4
Institute for Molecular Medicine, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz, Mainz, Germany.
5
Department of Biology, Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon, University of Lyon, Lyon, France.
6
Department of Genetics, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.
7
Department of Neurology, Institute of Clinical Research, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark.
8
Department of Neurobiology Research, Institute for Molecular Medicine, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark towens@health.sdu.dk.

Abstract

Microglia are resident macrophages of the central nervous system that contribute to homeostasis and neuroinflammation. Although known to play an important role in brain development, their exact function has not been fully described. Here, we show that in contrast to healthy adult and inflammation-activated cells, neonatal microglia show a unique myelinogenic and neurogenic phenotype. A CD11c+ microglial subset that predominates in primary myelinating areas of the developing brain expresses genes for neuronal and glial survival, migration, and differentiation. These cells are the major source of insulin-like growth factor 1, and its selective depletion from CD11c+ microglia leads to impairment of primary myelination. CD11c-targeted toxin regimens induced a selective transcriptional response in neonates, distinct from adult microglia. CD11c+ microglia are also found in clusters of repopulating microglia after experimental ablation and in neuroinflammation in adult mice, but despite some similarities, they do not recapitulate neonatal microglial characteristics. We therefore identify a unique phenotype of neonatal microglia that deliver signals necessary for myelination and neurogenesis.

KEYWORDS:

CD11c; IGF1; microglia; myelinogenesis

PMID:
28963396
PMCID:
PMC5686552
DOI:
10.15252/embj.201696056
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center