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BMJ Open. 2017 Sep 27;7(9):e017584. doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2017-017584.

Junior doctor psychiatry placements in hospital and community settings: a phenomenological study.

Author information

1
Medical Education Faculty, Tees, Esk and Wear Valleys NHS Foundation Trust, Middlesbrough, UK.
2
Monash Center for Scholarship in Health Education (MCSHE), Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
3
Research Department of Medical Education (RDME), Royal Free Hospital, UCL Medical School, London, UK.
4
Regional Department for Psychotherapy, Northumberland, Tyne and Wear NHS Foundation Trust, Northumberland, UK.
5
Postgraduate Dean, Health Education England North East, Newcastle, UK.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The proportion of junior doctors required to complete psychiatry placements in the UK has increased, due in part to vacant training posts and psychiatry career workforce shortages, as can be seen across the world. The aim of this study was to understand the lived experience of a Foundation Year 1 junior doctor psychiatry placement and to understand how job components influence attitudes.

DESIGN:

The study was conducted using a cross-sectional qualitative phenomenological approach.

SETTING:

Hospital and community psychiatry department settings in the North East of England, UK.

PARTICIPANTS:

In total, 14 Foundation Year 1 junior doctors were interviewed including seven men and seven women aged between 23 and 34 years. The majority had completed their medical degree in the UK and were White British.

RESULTS:

The lived experience of a junior doctor psychiatry placement was understood by three core themes: exposure to patient recovery, connectedness with others in the healthcare team and subjective interpretations of psychiatry. The experiences were moderated by instances of role definition, reaction to the specialty and the organisational fit of the junior doctor capacity in the specialty.

CONCLUSIONS:

The study reinforces and adds to the literature by identifying connectedness as being important for both job satisfaction and morale, which is currently damaged within the junior doctor population. The study provides in-depth insights into the lived experience of psychiatry placements and can be taken forward by educationalists to ensure the placements are meaningful experiences for junior doctors by developing role definition, belonging, structure and psychiatric care responsibility.

KEYWORDS:

education environment; phenomenology; postgraduate; psychiatry; workplace-based

PMID:
28963306
PMCID:
PMC5623527
DOI:
10.1136/bmjopen-2017-017584
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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