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Curr Opin Obstet Gynecol. 2017 Dec;29(6):359-366. doi: 10.1097/GCO.0000000000000417.

Does mindfulness meditation improve chronic pain? A systematic review.

Author information

1
aWomen's Health Research Unit, Centre for Primary Care and Public Health, Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London bRoyal Liverpool University Hospital, Liverpool cThe Royal London Hospital, Barts Health NHS Trust dMultidisciplinary Evidence Synthesis Hub (mEsh), Centre for Primary Care and Public Health, Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK.

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW:

Psychological factors are associated with chronic pain. Mindfulness meditation may ameliorate symptoms. The objective was to evaluate the effects of mindfulness meditation in chronic pain.

RECENT FINDINGS:

A systematic search of four databases identified 534 citations; 13 Randomised controlled trials satisfied the inclusion criteria. Mindfulness meditation significantly reduced depression [Standardised mean difference (SMD) -0.28; 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.53, -0.03; P = 0.03; I = 0%]. For affective pain (SMD -0.13; 95% CI -0.42, 0.16; I = 0%), sensory pain (SMD -0.02; 95% CI -0.31, 0.27; I = 0%) and anxiety (SMD -0.16; 95% CI -0.47, 0.15; I = 0%) there was a trend towards benefit with intervention. Quality of life items on mental health (SMD 0.65; 95% CI -0.27, 1.58; I = 69%), physical health (SMD 0.08; 95% CI -0.40, 0.56; I = 32%) and overall score (SMD 0.86, 95% CI -0.06, 1.78; I = 88%) improved with mindfulness meditation.

SUMMARY:

Mindfulness meditation has most prominent effect on psychological aspects on living with chronic pain, improving associated depression and quality of life.

PMID:
28961631
DOI:
10.1097/GCO.0000000000000417
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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