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Pediatr Surg Int. 2017 Nov;33(11):1215-1219. doi: 10.1007/s00383-017-4169-1. Epub 2017 Sep 27.

Does diverting ileostomy improve the outcome in children with tuberculous small bowel obstruction requiring surgical intervention?

Author information

1
Department of Pediatric Surgery, J. N. Medical College, AMU, Aligarh, UP, India.
2
Department of Radiodiagnosis, J. N. Medical College, AMU, Aligarh, UP, India. drshaguftawahab@rediffmail.com.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Abdominal tuberculosis is fairly common in children. The most common clinical presentation is bowel obstruction. Depending upon the presentation, the intestinal obstruction can be either managed conservatively or by operative intervention. There are various options in patients who undergo operative treatment. This study was undertaken to analyze the results of operative intervention with and without ileostomy.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

This is a retrospective study carried out over a period of 10 years on 32 children who were operated for small bowel obstruction due to abdominal tuberculosis. The patients were divided into two groups (A: with ileostomy and B: without ileostomy). The relevant data and the defined outcome measures were statistically analyzed.

RESULTS:

A total of 32 children with tuberculous bowel obstruction requiring surgical intervention were studied. The patient of group A had mean duration of postoperative ileus for 2.55 days, restoration of enteral feeding within mean period of 3.55 days and had a primary hospital stay for a mean period of 9.0 days. These outcomes when compared with group B patients were statistically significant.

CONCLUSION:

In children with bowel obstruction due to tuberculosis, diverting ileostomy decreases the morbidity by allowing early return of enteral motility, early institution of feeding and first-line ATT and decreasing the primary hospital stay.

KEYWORDS:

Abdominal tuberculosis; Children; Ileostomy; Small bowel obstruction

PMID:
28956144
DOI:
10.1007/s00383-017-4169-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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