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Psychiatr Danub. 2017 Sep;29(Suppl 3):157-163.

Barriers to accessing and consuming mental health services for Palestinians with psychological problems residing in refugee camps in Jordan.

Author information

1
School of Medicine, The University of Leeds, Leeds, LS2 9JT, UK, csmm@doctors.org.uk.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The Baqa'a refugee camp is the largest in Jordan, home to some 104,000 Palestine refugees. Barriers to accessing and consuming mental health services in Arab-refugees are well documented in the literature however few studies have been conducted hitherto to identify barriers for Palestine refugees with psychological problems residing in refugee camps in Jordan.

AIM:

To identify the barriers to accessing and consuming mental health services for Palestine refugees with psychological problems residing in Baqa'a refugee camp in Jordan and to formulate policy recommendations to overcome those barriers.

METHODS:

16 qualitative, semi-structured interviews were conducted with healthcare professionals working at health centres for Palestine refugees in Jordan, 14 of which were in health centres at Baqa'a refugee camp and the remaining two at the Field Office of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA) in Amman, Jordan. All the interviews were recorded and transcribed and thematic analyses conducted. Ethical approval was granted by the University of Leeds and UNRWA.

RESULTS:

16/16 (100%) respondents reported that resource and financial deficits were the most common barriers that contributed towards the treatment gap. Sex (15/16, (94%)), stigma and religion (12/16, (75%)) and culture (10/16, (63%)) were other major barriers identified.

DISCUSSION:

Our findings help to elucidate the contributory factors towards the treatment gap between Palestine refugees with psychological problems residing in Baqa'a refugee camp in Jordan and mental health services therein. Policy recommendations based on our results are formulated and are discussed in this research paper.

PMID:
28953757
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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