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Diabetes. 2017 Dec;66(12):3130-3141. doi: 10.2337/db17-0398. Epub 2017 Sep 26.

Genetically Determined Plasma Lipid Levels and Risk of Diabetic Retinopathy: A Mendelian Randomization Study.

Author information

1
Department of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts Eye and Ear, Boston, MA.
2
Duke-NUS Medical School, National University of Singapore, Singapore.
3
Singapore Eye Research Institute, Singapore National Eye Centre, Singapore.
4
Department of Ophthalmology, Flinders University, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia.
5
Human Genetics Center, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX.
6
Graduate Institute of Integrated Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan.
7
Center for Personalized Medicine, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan.
8
School of Chinese Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan.
9
Genetic Center, Department of Medical Research, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan.
10
Department of Medical Research, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan.
11
Department of Internal Medicine, Tri-Service General Hospital, Taipei City, Taiwan.
12
Institute for Translational Genomics and Population Sciences, LA BioMed, and Department of Pediatrics, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, CA.
13
Department of Medicine, LA BioMed, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, CA.
14
Department of Statistical Genetics, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA.
15
Department of Ophthalmology, The University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS.
16
Department of Medicine, The University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS.
17
Centre for Vision Research, The Westmead Institute for Medical Research, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
18
Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavík, Iceland.
19
Icelandic Heart Association, Kópavogur, Iceland.
20
Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI.
21
Clinical and Medical Affairs, CardioDx, Inc., Redwood City, CA.
22
Cardiovascular Health Research Unit, Division of General Internal Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.
23
Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute, Seattle, WA.
24
Division of Epidemiology and Clinical Applications, National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD.
25
Departments of Medical Genetics, Pediatrics, and Medical Research, China Medical University Hospital, Tiachung, Tiawan.
26
Menzies Institute for Medical Research, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia.
27
Department of Ophthalmology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore.
28
Duke-NUS Medical School, National University of Singapore, Singapore chingyu.cheng@duke-nus.edu.sg.

Abstract

Results from observational studies examining dyslipidemia as a risk factor for diabetic retinopathy (DR) have been inconsistent. We evaluated the causal relationship between plasma lipids and DR using a Mendelian randomization approach. We pooled genome-wide association studies summary statistics from 18 studies for two DR phenotypes: any DR (N = 2,969 case and 4,096 control subjects) and severe DR (N = 1,277 case and 3,980 control subjects). Previously identified lipid-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms served as instrumental variables. Meta-analysis to combine the Mendelian randomization estimates from different cohorts was conducted. There was no statistically significant change in odds ratios of having any DR or severe DR for any of the lipid fractions in the primary analysis that used single nucleotide polymorphisms that did not have a pleiotropic effect on another lipid fraction. Similarly, there was no significant association in the Caucasian and Chinese subgroup analyses. This study did not show evidence of a causal role of the four lipid fractions on DR. However, the study had limited power to detect odds ratios less than 1.23 per SD in genetically induced increase in plasma lipid levels, thus we cannot exclude that causal relationships with more modest effect sizes exist.

PMID:
28951389
PMCID:
PMC5697951
DOI:
10.2337/db17-0398
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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