Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Psychiatr Q. 2018 Jun;89(2):293-305. doi: 10.1007/s11126-017-9534-7.

Feasibility, Acceptability, and Preliminary Effectiveness of a Peer-Delivered and Technology Supported Self-Management Intervention for Older Adults with Serious Mental Illness.

Author information

1
Dartmouth Centers for Health and Aging, 46 Centerra Parkway, Suite 200, Lebanon, NH, 03766, USA. Karen.L.Fortuna@dartmouth.edu.
2
CDC Health Promotion Research Center at Dartmouth, Lebanon, NH, USA. Karen.L.Fortuna@dartmouth.edu.
3
Department of Psychiatry, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Hanover, NH, USA. Karen.L.Fortuna@dartmouth.edu.
4
Dartmouth Centers for Health and Aging, 46 Centerra Parkway, Suite 200, Lebanon, NH, 03766, USA.
5
The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy & Clinical Practice, Lebanon, NH, USA.
6
CDC Health Promotion Research Center at Dartmouth, Lebanon, NH, USA.
7
Department of Psychiatry, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Hanover, NH, USA.
8
Center for Mental Health Policy and Services Research, School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
9
Northeast Independent Living Program, Lawrence, MA, USA.
10
Massachusetts Department of Mental Health, Boston, MA, USA.

Abstract

To assess the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary effectiveness of a peer-delivered and technology supported integrated medical and psychiatric self-management intervention for older adults with serious mental illness. Ten older adults with serious mental illness (i.e., schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, bipolar disorder, or major depressive disorder) and medical comorbidity (i.e., cardiovascular disease, obesity, diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, hypertension, and/or high cholesterol) aged 60 years and older received the PeerTECH intervention in their homes. Three certified peer specialists were trained to deliver PeerTECH. Data were collected at baseline, one-month, and three-month. The pilot study demonstrated that a three-month, peer-delivered and technology-supported integrated medical and psychiatric self-management intervention ("PeerTECH") was experienced by peer specialists and participants as feasible and acceptable. PeerTECH was associated with statistically significant improvements in psychiatric self-management. In addition, pre/post, non-statistically significant improvements were observed in self-efficacy for managing chronic health conditions, hope, quality of life, medical self-management skills, and empowerment. This pre/post pilot study demonstrated it is possible to train peers to use technology to deliver an integrated psychiatric and medical self-management intervention in a home-based setting to older adults with serious mental illness with fidelity. These findings provide preliminary evidence that a peer-delivered and technology-supported intervention designed to improve medical and psychiatric self-management is feasible, acceptable, and is potentially associated with improvements in psychiatric self-management, self-efficacy for managing chronic health conditions, hope, quality of life, medical self-management skills, and empowerment with older adults with serious mental illness and chronic health conditions.

KEYWORDS:

Peers; Serious mental illness; mHealth

PMID:
28948424
PMCID:
PMC5874159
[Available on 2019-06-01]
DOI:
10.1007/s11126-017-9534-7

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer
Loading ...
Support Center