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Surg Today. 2018 Mar;48(3):338-345. doi: 10.1007/s00595-017-1590-y. Epub 2017 Sep 25.

Modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors for surgical site infection after colorectal surgery: a single-center experience.

Author information

1
Division of General Surgery, Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, Hospital of Cattinara, University of Trieste, Strada di Fiume 447, 34149, Trieste, Italy. silvestri_marta@libero.it.
2
Division of General Surgery, Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, Hospital of Cattinara, University of Trieste, Strada di Fiume 447, 34149, Trieste, Italy.
3
Division of Infective Diseases, ASUITS and University of Trieste, Trieste, Italy.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Surgical site infection (SSI) is the most common complication of colorectal surgery, resulting in significant burden in terms of morbidity and length of hospital stay. The aims of this study were to establish the incidence of SSI in patients undergoing colorectal surgeries and to identify potentially modifiable risk factors to reduce overall SSI rates.

METHODS:

This retrospective study analyzed patients who underwent colorectal resection at our Department. Patients were identified using a prospective SSI database. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to identify risk factors.

RESULTS:

A total of 687 patients were enrolled in the study and the overall SSI rate was 19.9% (137 patients). Superficial incisional surgical site infections (SSSIs) developed in 52 (7.6%) patients, deep incisional surgical site infections (DSSIs) developed in 15 (2.2%), and organ/space infections (OSIs) developed in 70 (10.1%). Univariate and multivariate analyses confirmed that age, diabetes, emergency surgery, and a high infection risk index are risk factors for SSI.

CONCLUSIONS:

There are some modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors for SSI. IRI and age are non-modifiable, whereas the timing of surgery and diabetes can be modulated by trying to defer some emergency procedures to elective ones and normalizing the glycemia of diabetic patients.

KEYWORDS:

Abdominal infections; Colorectal surgery; Surgical site infection

PMID:
28948367
DOI:
10.1007/s00595-017-1590-y
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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