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Sci Total Environ. 2018 Feb 1;613-614:886-893. doi: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.09.181. Epub 2017 Sep 21.

Preliminary assessment on exposure of four typical populations to potentially toxic metals by means of skin wipes under the influence of haze pollution.

Author information

1
School of Environment, Henan Normal University, Key Laboratory for Yellow River and Huai River Water Environment and Pollution Control, Ministry of Education, Henan Key Laboratory for Environmental Pollution Control, Xinxiang 453007, China; Beijing Key Laboratory for Emerging Organic Contaminants Control, School of Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China.
2
School of Environment, Henan Normal University, Key Laboratory for Yellow River and Huai River Water Environment and Pollution Control, Ministry of Education, Henan Key Laboratory for Environmental Pollution Control, Xinxiang 453007, China.
3
Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Silviculture and Conversation, Beijing Forestry University, Beijing 100083, China. Electronic address: benyexi@bjfu.edu.cn.
4
School of Chemical & Environmental Engineering, China University of Mining & Technology - Beijing, Beijing 100083, China. Electronic address: qingwei.bu@cumtb.edu.cn.

Abstract

To investigate the exposure risk of human beings to nine potentially toxic metals (PTMs), namely, Cu, Cr, Zn, As, Cd, Pb, Ni, Mn, and Co, skin wipe samples were collected from four types of populations, namely, children, undergraduates, security guards, and professional drivers, under different haze pollution levels in Xinxiang, China by using Ghost wipes. The Ghost wipes were quantitatively analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) after microwave digestion. Generally, Zn (ND-1350μg/m2 for undergraduates, ND-2660μg/m2 for security guards, ND-2460μg/m2 for children, and ND-2530μg/m2 for professional drivers) showed the highest concentration among the four populations, followed by Cu (0.02-83.4μg/m2 for undergraduates, ND-70.2μg/m2 for security guards, 23.2-487μg/m2 for children, and ND-116μg/m2 for professional drivers). As (ND-5.7μg/m2 for undergraduates, ND-2.3μg/m2 for security guards, ND-21.1μg/m2 for children, and ND-11.0μg/m2 for professional drivers) and Co (ND-6.0μg/m2 for undergraduates, ND-7.9μg/m2 for security guards, ND-13.4μg/m2 for children, and ND-2.1μg/m2 for professional drivers) showed the lowest concentrations in all populations. Remarkable differences were found among the four populations and PTM levels decreased in the following order: children, professional drivers, security guards, and undergraduates. Gender variation was discovered for undergraduates and children. Generally, PTM contamination in skin wipes collected during a light haze pollution level was generally higher than that during a heavy haze pollution level, but PTM contamination was comparable between the two haze pollution levels for children. Non-carcinogenic exposure risks to As, Cd, and Pb for all populations were higher than those for the other six elements but all of them were within the acceptable safety threshold, indicating no apparent non-carcinogenic risk.

KEYWORDS:

Dermal exposure; Dust; Exposure assessment; Haze levels; Potentially toxic metal

PMID:
28946377
DOI:
10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.09.181
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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