Format

Send to

Choose Destination
PLoS One. 2017 Sep 25;12(9):e0185105. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0185105. eCollection 2017.

Trends in prevalence of multi drug resistant tuberculosis in sub-Saharan Africa: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, Bayero University, Kano, Nigeria.
2
Department of Medicine, Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital, Kano, Nigeria.
3
Department of Community Medicine, Bayero University, Kano, Nigeria.
4
Department of Community Medicine, Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital, Kano, Nigeria.
5
Department of Hematology, Bayero University, Kano, Nigeria.
6
Department of Hematology, Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital, Kano, Nigeria.
7
IHVN Regional Office, Institute of Human Virology, Kano, Nigeria.
8
University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky, United States of America.
9
Vanderbilt Institute for Global Health, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee, United States of America.
10
Department of Health Policy, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee, United States of America.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Multidrug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB), is an emerging public health problem in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). This study aims to determine the trends in prevalence of MDR-TB among new TB cases in sub-Saharan Africa over two decades.

METHODS:

We searched electronic data bases and accessed all prevalence studies of MDR-TB within SSA between 2007 and 2017. We determined pooled prevalence estimates using random effects models and determined trends using meta-regression.

RESULTS:

Results: We identified 915 studies satisfying inclusion criteria. Cumulatively, studies reported on MDR-TB culture of 34,652 persons. The pooled prevalence of MDR-TB in new cases was 2.1% (95% CI; 1.7-2.5%). There was a non-significant decline in prevalence by 0.12% per year.

CONCLUSION:

We found a low prevalence estimate of MDR-TB, and a slight temporal decline over the study period. There is a need for continuous MDR-TB surveillance among patients with TB.

PMID:
28945771
PMCID:
PMC5612652
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0185105
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Public Library of Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center