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Nat Rev Immunol. 2018 Jan;18(1):19-34. doi: 10.1038/nri.2017.99. Epub 2017 Sep 25.

The spectrum of T cell metabolism in health and disease.

Bantug GR1, Galluzzi L2,3,4, Kroemer G4,5,6,7,8,9,10, Hess C1.

Author information

1
Immunobiology, Department of Biomedicine, University and University Hospital of Basel, Hebelstrasse 20, Basel 4031, Switzerland.
2
Department of Radiation Oncology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, 10065 New York, USA.
3
Sandra and Edward Meyer Cancer Center, New York, 10065 New York, USA.
4
Université Paris Descartes, Paris V, 75006 Paris, France.
5
Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris VI, 75006 Paris, France.
6
Equipe 11 labellisée par la Ligue contre le Cancer, Centre de Recherche des Cordeliers, 75006 Paris, France.
7
INSERM, U1138, 75006 Paris, France.
8
Metabolomics and Cell Biology Platforms, Gustave Roussy Comprehensive Cancer Institute, 94805 Villejuif, France.
9
Pôle de Biologie, Hôpital Européen George Pompidou, AP-HP, 75015 Paris, France.
10
Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska University Hospital, 17176 Stockholm, Sweden.

Abstract

In healthy individuals, metabolically quiescent T cells survey lymph nodes and peripheral tissues in search of cognate antigens. During infection, T cells that encounter cognate antigens are activated and - in a context-specific manner - proliferate and/or differentiate to become effector T cells. This process is accompanied by important changes in cellular metabolism (known as metabolic reprogramming). The magnitude and spectrum of metabolic reprogramming as it occurs in T cells in the context of acute infection ensure host survival. By contrast, altered T cell metabolism, and hence function, is also observed in various disease states, in which T cells actively contribute to pathology. In this Review, we introduce the idea that the spectrum of immune cell metabolic states can provide a basis for categorizing human diseases. Specifically, we first summarize the metabolic and interlinked signalling requirements of T cells responding to acute infection. We then discuss how metabolic reprogramming of T cells is linked to disease.

PMID:
28944771
DOI:
10.1038/nri.2017.99

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