Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Cell Host Microbe. 2017 Oct 11;22(4):531-542.e8. doi: 10.1016/j.chom.2017.08.009. Epub 2017 Sep 21.

Dietary Manganese Promotes Staphylococcal Infection of the Heart.

Author information

1
Department of Pathology, Microbiology, and Immunology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, 1161 21(st) Avenue South, MCN A-5102, Nashville, TN 37232, USA.
2
Department of Microbiology, Microbial Pathogenesis Program, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016, USA.
3
Department of Chemistry, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37232, USA; Mass Spectrometry Research Center, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37232, USA.
4
Mass Spectrometry Research Center, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37232, USA.
5
Center for Structural Biology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37232, USA; Department of Biochemistry, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37232, USA.
6
Department of Microbiology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA.
7
Department of Pathology, Microbiology, and Immunology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, 1161 21(st) Avenue South, MCN A-5102, Nashville, TN 37232, USA; Division of Allergy, Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232, USA.
8
Department of Chemistry, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37232, USA; Center for Structural Biology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37232, USA; Department of Biochemistry, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37232, USA.
9
Department of Chemistry, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37232, USA; Mass Spectrometry Research Center, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37232, USA; Department of Biochemistry, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37232, USA.
10
Department of Pathology, Microbiology, and Immunology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, 1161 21(st) Avenue South, MCN A-5102, Nashville, TN 37232, USA. Electronic address: eric.skaar@vanderbilt.edu.

Abstract

Diet, and specifically dietary metals, can modify the risk of infection. However, the mechanisms by which manganese (Mn), a common dietary supplement, alters infection remain unexplored. We report that dietary Mn levels dictate the outcome of systemic infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus, a leading cause of bacterial endocarditis. Mice fed a high Mn diet display alterations in Mn levels and localization within infected tissues, and S. aureus virulence and infection of the heart are enhanced. Although the canonical mammalian Mn-sequestering protein calprotectin surrounds staphylococcal heart abscesses, calprotectin is not released into the abscess nidus and does not limit Mn in this organ. Consequently, excess Mn is bioavailable to S. aureus in the heart. Bioavailable Mn is utilized by S. aureus to detoxify reactive oxygen species and protect against neutrophil killing, enhancing fitness within the heart. Therefore, a single dietary modification overwhelms vital host antimicrobial strategies, leading to fatal staphylococcal infection.

KEYWORDS:

Staphylococcus aureus; bacterial pathogenesis; calprotectin; diet; endocarditis; manganese; neutrophils; nutritional immunity; oxidative stress

PMID:
28943329
PMCID:
PMC5638708
DOI:
10.1016/j.chom.2017.08.009
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center