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Br J Pharmacol. 2017 Dec;174(23):4449-4463. doi: 10.1111/bph.14047. Epub 2017 Oct 19.

Nonclinical cardiovascular safety of pitolisant: comparing International Conference on Harmonization S7B and Comprehensive in vitro Pro-arrhythmia Assay initiative studies.

Author information

1
Bioprojet-Biotech, Saint-Grégoire, France.
2
Pharmaceutical Consultant, Gerrards Cross, UK.
3
Centre for Mathematical Medicine and Biology, School of Mathematical Sciences, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK.
4
Hôpital Bichat, Paris, France.
5
Laboratoire Signalisation et Transports Ioniques Membranaires, Université de Poitiers-CNRS, Poitiers, France.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE:

We evaluated the concordance of results from two sets of nonclinical cardiovascular safety studies on pitolisant.

EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH:

Nonclinical studies envisaged both in the International Conference on Harmonization (ICH) S7B guideline and Comprehensive in vitro Pro-arrhythmia Assay (CiPA) initiative were undertaken. The CiPA initiative included in vitro ion channels, stem cell-derived human ventricular myocytes, and in silico modelling to simulate human ventricular electrophysiology. ICH S7B-recommended assays included in vitro hERG (KV 11.1) channels, in vivo dog studies with follow-up investigations in rabbit Purkinje fibres and the in vivo Carlsson rabbit pro-arrhythmia model.

KEY RESULTS:

Both sets of nonclinical data consistently excluded pitolisant from having clinically relevant QT-liability or pro-arrhythmic potential. CiPA studies revealed pitolisant to have modest calcium channel blocking and late INa reducing activities at high concentrations, which resulted in pitolisant reducing dofetilide-induced early after-depolarizations (EADs) in the ICH S7B studies. Studies in stem cell-derived human cardiomyocytes with dofetilide or E-4031 given alone and in combination with pitolisant confirmed these properties. In silico modelling confirmed that the ion channel effects measured are consistent with results from both the stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes and rabbit Purkinje fibres and categorized pitolisant as a drug with low torsadogenic potential. Results from the two sets of nonclinical studies correlated well with those from two clinical QT studies.

CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS:

Our findings support the CiPA initiative but suggest that sponsors should consider investigating drug effects on EADs and the use of pro-arrhythmia models when the results from CiPA studies are ambiguous.

PMID:
28941245
PMCID:
PMC5715595
DOI:
10.1111/bph.14047
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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